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Keeping filters and lenses from fogging on rain shoots

Doug OKane
 

When working on set with rain towers pouring on us or working in natuarl rain, fogging always becomes a problem with the filter and lenses. The humidity levels are in the 90's and the volume of cold water being dumped on us can cause a servere drop in the temperture around us. Sometimes just having the filter close to your hands for a filter change can cause a delay due to fogging. I have tried a some of the anti fog juices on the filters with some luck. But I have never applied them directly to the lenses because of possibly damaging the coatings. I would love to hear what tricks other AC's are using for both lenses and filters. I know I am not the only one standing out in the rain.

Eoin
 

Hair dryers and hot lights on standby!  I’d be curious about any solutions.  Ive done coolers with electric heatpads or loads of those hand warmers inside.  “Cat spit” and anti fog hasn’t ever worked well enough for filters in my opinion to even bother with lenses.  Just remember that it’s only cold to hot and not the other way round that causes fog. So if you keep your lenses warm in storage that can help quite a bit 


On Nov 1, 2018 at 3:27 AM, <Doug OKane> wrote:

When working on set with rain towers pouring on us or working in natuarl rain, fogging always becomes a problem 

Mako Koiwai
 


So if you keep your lenses warm in storage that can help quite a bit


***********

On Winter location movies, like SILVERADO … we always kept our gear cold. It was only infrequently that we actually had a warm set. We would typically have enough warning to then warm up gear.

It was much better to have cold cameras and lenses so we didn’t have to worry about snow melt. Panaflexes had their heater cables plugged in to keep their internals warm, after their morning warm up … running without film. Batteries insulated in coolers actually seemed to last longer then back in Hollywood. The heat they gave off in use was enough to keep them warm and going in their Igloo “coolers."

Hydrophilic filters might help your issues: https://www.newsshooter.com/2015/07/22/no-more-rain-drops-on-your-lens-the-tokina-hydrophilic-water-dispersion-filter-reviewed/

I HAVE used anti-fogging products successfully. They must be applied carefully, properly and often.

Interesting … on McDonald’s commercials, the soft drinks can never show condensation. Condensation would mean that the cold cups had been sitting around for a while.

makofoto, s. pasadena, ca

Eoin
 

I think his issue is with dealing with a camera in rain versus being in a cold snowy environment (unless it's physically snowing!).   When you have the camera bagged up to protect from rain everything gets hot so of course you'd want the gear to be at a normal temperature over a cold one.  

I live in the cold cold north and have worked on enough projects where they SAY we'll have enough warning if we're moving interior after being exterior...but even so it can be really hard to get lenses inside quickly to warm up when they're still using outside - really the best solution was to have a second set inside and waiting :) 
*Style is about choice, not concept. It should be organic, not composed.

eoin mcguigan
ac
mpls


On Thu, Nov 1, 2018 at 3:47 PM Mako Koiwai <mako1foto@...> wrote:
On Nov 1, 2018, at 07:33, Eoin <westofthesun@...> wrote:

So if you keep your lenses warm in storage that can help quite a bit


***********

On Winter location movies, like SILVERADO … we always kept our gear cold. It was only infrequently that we actually had a warm set. We would typically have enough warning to then warm up gear.

It was much better to have cold cameras and lenses so we didn’t have to worry about snow melt. Panaflexes had their heater cables plugged in to keep their internals warm, after their morning warm up … running without film. Batteries insulated in coolers actually seemed to last longer then back in Hollywood. The heat they gave off in use was enough to keep them warm and going in their Igloo “coolers."

Hydrophilic filters might help your issues: https://www.newsshooter.com/2015/07/22/no-more-rain-drops-on-your-lens-the-tokina-hydrophilic-water-dispersion-filter-reviewed/

I HAVE used anti-fogging products successfully. They must be applied carefully, properly and often.

Interesting … on McDonald’s commercials, the soft drinks can never show condensation. Condensation would mean that the cold cups had been sitting around for a while.

makofoto, s. pasadena, ca

Andy Hoehn
 
Edited

When you bag a digital camera and then drop cold rain on the rain spinner or filter, you're going to get fog.  The solution is air flow.  You don't need a lot, just a small amount works.  The trick is to blow the air behind the spinner.  I worked with an AC that had the SFX department make some air tubes for us but a few years ago I made some myself.  I've attached some pics below.

Get some copper tubing about 10 inches long, drill small holes along its length and add a 1/4 inch NPT fitting to one end.  Flatten the other end.  Paint it flat black if you're picky like me!  I got all the parts at my local home center.  Copper tubing is 3/8" and is used to supply water to an ice maker on the fridge.

Put the rain spinner in the front filter slot of your matte box and then tape this tube to one side of an empty filter slot behind the spinner so that it blows air across the back of the spinner.  Attach an air hose to the air tube with an air compressor (nitrogen tanks work even better) on the other end.  Set your air flow to 15-20 psi and you're good to go.  It works very well.  I never use any "anti-fog juice" or wax products.

Andy Hoehn
First Assistant Camera
Atlanta, GA  USA

chris.walton@...
 

I can't say that I have experience with exactly this situation but I have dealt with early morning time lapses near water which also can have condensation issues. I bought a lens heater which is basically a strap with a heater element that wraps around the end of the lens and fastens with velcro. You can find them on Amazon for under $20 and they can be set up to run off of a USB type battery.

Chris Walton
Principal
Visual Story Productions