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Question, was : Camera issue, possible causes?

Argyris_Theos_cml
 

My question is : why would anyone want to use a standard 16 camera today?

Argyris Theos, gsc 
DoP, Athens Greece,
+306944725315
Skype Argyris.Theos
via iPhone

26 Μαΐ 2018, 1:17 μμ, ο/η Jay Young <jay@...> έγραψε:

People keep telling me to get an Arri, but I do like this CP-16.  Someday I'll spend the money and get a PL conversion, but not yet.

There were a bunch of belts to be had online.  I'll see if I can find one of those.




Thanks!


On 5/26/2018 1:39 AM, Rick Gerard wrote:
Hate to jump in again but I put more than a million feet of film through a CP 16R and it’s the belt. They get brittle, teeth break off, and the shutter gets out of sync. Replace the belt. It is pretty easy to do if you can find a belt.

Rick Gerard


-- 
Jay Young - Cinematographer
606-312-2628
YoungPictures.org
Kentucky

john@...
 

There's lots of reasons to use standard 4:3 16mm. Just because so many people choose to chase everything and anything new does not mean that old technology is not good.

I have used Std 4:3 16mm pure and also with Anamorphic lenses for many different projects by artists such as Tacita Dean currently having several films showing at the Royal Academy and The National Portrait Gallery. Most of the films were shot on Std 16mm, some with spherical lenses and others with Anamorphics.
https://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/tacita-dean/exhibition/
4:3 16mm has a particularly beautiful look, especially when projected as film in a dark gallery. "Disappearance At Sea" is a particularly good example of 16mm Anamorphic on a Std gate when it was shown for several months at Tate Modern. Also, have a look at "Prisoner Pair" 
https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2011/jan/01/tacita-dean-common-guild-review
 currently showing at the Portrait Gallery in London. I shot that on standard 16mm in my backyard. Tacita never allows her films to be shown on video.

Emily Richardson asked me to shoot this film on Anamorphic 16mm.
https://vimeo.com/28464270
because it suited the environment as you can see. on a 4:3 gate the aspect ratio looks beautiful.

So I'm glad the question is asked about older technologies. When they invented Acrylics did artists stop using oils?

BTW I also use hand cranked 16mm and 35mm wooden cameras. They have a beautiful look about the produced image which cannot be successfully created by digital means. See front page of my web site.
and https://vimeo.com/32579588

John Adderley
Kinematographer London
john@...
www.adderley.net

Daniel Henríquez-Ilic
 

john@... wrote:

'Emily Richardson asked me to shoot this film on 16mm Anamorphic'

Great example ('Cobra Mist'). Beautiful work.
Which anamorphic lens  did you use?

The only restriction  currently with Standard 16mm is that there is only one Eastman Kodak stock perforated two edges (7219 Vision3 500T). I am not aware of other Kodak camera negative (color or black and white) perforated two edges, everything else  is 16mm 1R based  in Kodak catalog of Sept 2017.
But 7219 is an amazing stock, so still fine, as it is at least fresh stock. And I guess any other stock should be available , perforated 2 edges , by special request.

Thank you for the link of the 35mm wooden camera short film 'The Time traTravellers of 1908'. Excellent, funny  project! Very interesting to see these cameras working a century plus, after their construction and the motion picture they still deliver today. One really feel the connection between the camera operator and the rythm of the sequence of frames exposed to light  and shadow.
BTW FotoKem has an amazing collection of 35mm and 16mm cameras in permanent  exhibition  including several wooden cameras. All seems to be in working conditions.

Daniel Henríquez Ilic
Filmmaker
Film Photographer
Post-Producer
Santiago de Chile

gleurquin@...
 

Le 27 mai 2018 à 16:40, Daniel Henríquez-Ilic <dhisur@...> a écrit :
The only restriction currently with Standard 16mm is that there is only one Eastman Kodak stock perforated two edges (7219 Vision3 500T)

AFAIK, all the original std 16mm cameras here in Europe (NPR 16, ACL, Arri ST,…) were single claw cameras, so you don’t need double perf stock.
But maybe I am missing something.

Regards,
Georges Leurquin
DP
Brussels

Daniel Henríquez-Ilic
 


<gleurquin@...> escribió:

> AFAIK, all the original std 16mm cameras here in Europe (NPR 16, ACL, Arri ST,…) were single claw cameras, so you don’t need double perf stock.
> But maybe I am missing something.

Thanks for the correcting. Checking into cinematography.net edited pages I have found a thread regarding 'Double Perf 16' that mentions Mitchell 16 and Photosonics ActionMaster 500 dual pin registered, as cameras using 16mm double  perf.  I thought more Standard 16mm cameras were using Double Perf.

https://www.cinematography.net/edited-pages/Double-Perf16.htm

Best Regards,
Daniel Henríquez Ilic
Filmmaker
Film Photographer
Post-Producer
Santiago de Chile

john@...
 

Hi Daniel
thanks for you r comment. The camera used was an Eclair ACL for which I built a timelapse motor. It consisted of a stepper motor driven by a small board made by Greenwich instruments. There was a chap there that programmed the chip specially for me which included the addition of an LDR which could vary the exposure time with the changing light. I used two types of lenses. I used my Lomo Anamorphics for which Les Bosher fitted BNCR and PL dual mounts. One of the good things about the ACL is its lens mount which has an adaptor which can convert to PL, BNCR, Arri Std, Arri Bay, Leica, CM3, Uncle Tom Cobbly and all. It has a focal plane shuttergreat for long period timelapse. I also used Zeiss Distagons with a Kowa Prominar Anamorphic built onto the front. That assembly is a bit laborious to use becuse you have to focus both lenses but were not talking documentary or drama here. We nearly froze up there on Orford Ness but it's a wonderful and eerie place for landscapes.

I've put up some location shots of the camera with the lenses and motor and the Moy head with steppers for motion Control. The rotation shots were a tribute to the pioneers of Radar who did their first experiments on Orford Ness and developed Radar in its infancy just down the coast in Bawdsey Manor.

As for the wooden cameras (and I have mentioned these before on CML) please take a look at www.theracetocinema.com as I have shot with most of these. Unfortunately Gordon died recently and we all miss him but we are trying to find a good home to place the collection. It must be an institution, say, a university which has the means to display it and also to allow people to study them and write about them. They trace the early development of the moving image and the engineering ideas which led to modern film cine cameras. 

John Adderley FRGS
Kinematographer and MoCo
London UK
www.adderley.net
john@...