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Batteries on domestic flights in Argentina

Christopher Rowe
 

I will be flying with my Amira to Argentina in 2 weeks and was planning to take 4 150Wh batteries, split between myself and my AC in our carry-ons, as has always worked in the past all over the world. But now the local producer has informed me that Li-ion batteries are not allowed at all on domestic flights in Argentina, not even the 2 per person <160Wh permitted by IATA rules. I wonder if this really the case, or if the producer just had a bad experience with misinformed airport staff.

Has anyone tried to take Li-ion batteries on board a domestic flight in Argentina recently? Did you encounter any problems? In all we have 6 Amiras and are looking at ground transport options for the batteries for the other cameras, but in my case it would mean loosing a day of shooting if this is the only option.

Thanks for any advice.
Chris

Christopher Rowe
British DP, based in Berlin
Arri Amira Owner/Operator
www.christopher-rowe.de
 

Tom Turley
 

I’d be amazed if that were true. I have no specific help for you on that but 2 things worth mentioning:

1) strictly speaking anything over 100wh is only allowed at the airline’s discretion. So the fact that it’s legitimate to carry 2x 150wh per person in carry-on under aviation rules doesn’t necessarily help you...

2) I just travelled with 2 cameras to Guatemala for a doc and I carried 10 of the PAG 100wh (or 96?) flight safe batts (useful because they have an “IATA flight safe” logo on the body of the battery to show officials). A singular one lasts about a nanosecond on its own but they are functional when used with 2x stacked (Amira/Mini) and they can be carried in limitless amounts as carry on within current aviation rules.

Tom Turley
Represented by Vision at Wizzo 
London

------------------------------
= Tom Turley
= tom@filmtom
= 07900432114

On 29 Oct 2018, at 17:06, Christopher Rowe <chris@...> wrote:

I will be flying with my Amira to Argentina in 2 weeks and was planning to take 4 150Wh batteries, split between myself and my AC in our carry-ons, as has always worked in the past all over the world. But now the local producer has informed me that Li-ion batteries are not allowed at all on domestic flights in Argentina, not even the 2 per person <160Wh permitted by IATA rules. I wonder if this really the case, or if the producer just had a bad experience with misinformed airport staff.

Has anyone tried to take Li-ion batteries on board a domestic flight in Argentina recently? Did you encounter any problems? In all we have 6 Amiras and are looking at ground transport options for the batteries for the other cameras, but in my case it would mean loosing a day of shooting if this is the only option.

Thanks for any advice.
Chris

Christopher Rowe
British DP, based in Berlin
Arri Amira Owner/Operator
www.christopher-rowe.de
 

jasecd@...
 

I flew from Buenos Aires to Mendoza & back three times in April (awkward scheduling on the project!) on Aerolineas - each time I was carrying four Endura 96wh V-locks in my hand luggage. I was stopped going through security on two of the six flights but there were no issues with the batteries.

Hope this helps.

--
Jason Hall
DP // Camera
Bristol // London

Rainer Speidel
 

Hey Chris,

Maybe this batteries could solve your problem...

Best.
Rainer

Rainer Speidel
DOP | Senior Editor| Colorist
Braunschweiger Str. 80, 12055 Berlin, Germany
+49 172 7304162

von unterwegs gesendet



Rainer Speidel
DOP | Schnittmeister | Mischtonmeister | Colorist
Braunschweiger Str. 80, 12055 Berlin
+49 172 7304162

von unterwegs gesendet
Am 29.10.2018 um 20:48 schrieb Tom Turley via Cml.News <turleytw=googlemail.com@...>:

I’d be amazed if that were true. I have no specific help for you on that but 2 things worth mentioning:

1) strictly speaking anything over 100wh is only allowed at the airline’s discretion. So the fact that it’s legitimate to carry 2x 150wh per person in carry-on under aviation rules doesn’t necessarily help you...

2) I just travelled with 2 cameras to Guatemala for a doc and I carried 10 of the PAG 100wh (or 96?) flight safe batts (useful because they have an “IATA flight safe” logo on the body of the battery to show officials). A singular one lasts about a nanosecond on its own but they are functional when used with 2x stacked (Amira/Mini) and they can be carried in limitless amounts as carry on within current aviation rules.

Tom Turley
Represented by Vision at Wizzo 
London

------------------------------
= Tom Turley
= tom@filmtom
= 07900432114

On 29 Oct 2018, at 17:06, Christopher Rowe <chris@...> wrote:

I will be flying with my Amira to Argentina in 2 weeks and was planning to take 4 150Wh batteries, split between myself and my AC in our carry-ons, as has always worked in the past all over the world. But now the local producer has informed me that Li-ion batteries are not allowed at all on domestic flights in Argentina, not even the 2 per person <160Wh permitted by IATA rules. I wonder if this really the case, or if the producer just had a bad experience with misinformed airport staff.

Has anyone tried to take Li-ion batteries on board a domestic flight in Argentina recently? Did you encounter any problems? In all we have 6 Amiras and are looking at ground transport options for the batteries for the other cameras, but in my case it would mean loosing a day of shooting if this is the only option.

Thanks for any advice.
Chris

Christopher Rowe
British DP, based in Berlin
Arri Amira Owner/Operator
www.christopher-rowe.de
 

Ken Robinson
 

Which airline will you be using? Shouldn't be difficult to check directly. Let me know and I will try and ask.

You can send me a direct email: flight4@...

Ken
Ken Robinson
Colourist
Patagonia


On Mon, 29 Oct 2018 at 17:06, Christopher Rowe <chris@...> wrote:
I will be flying with my Amira to Argentina in 2 weeks and was planning to take 4 150Wh batteries, split between myself and my AC in our carry-ons, as has always worked in the past all over the world. But now the local producer has informed me that Li-ion batteries are not allowed at all on domestic flights in Argentina, not even the 2 per person <160Wh permitted by IATA rules. I wonder if this really the case, or if the producer just had a bad experience with misinformed airport staff.

Has anyone tried to take Li-ion batteries on board a domestic flight in Argentina recently? Did you encounter any problems? In all we have 6 Amiras and are looking at ground transport options for the batteries for the other cameras, but in my case it would mean loosing a day of shooting if this is the only option.

Thanks for any advice.
Chris

Christopher Rowe
British DP, based in Berlin
Arri Amira Owner/Operator
www.christopher-rowe.de
 

Bob Kertesz
 

and they can be carried in limitless amounts as carry on within current aviation rules.


Because their greed really does know no bounds, airlines are now experimenting with both charging for carry-on and limiting carry-on weight. If the traveling public doesn't scream too loudly, look for all the major airlines to implement this soon.

It's always best to check with the airline in question to see what today's rules are.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

On 10/29/2018 12:48 PM, Tom Turley via Cml.News wrote:

2) I just travelled with 2 cameras to Guatemala for a doc and I carried 10 of the PAG 100wh (or 96?) flight safe batts (useful because they have an “IATA flight safe” logo on the body of the battery to show officials). A singular one lasts about a nanosecond on its own but they are functional when used with 2x stacked (Amira/Mini) and they can be carried in limitless amounts as carry on within current aviation rules.

Tom Turley
Represented by Vision at Wizzo 
London

------------------------------
= Tom Turley
= tom@filmtom
= 07900432114

Agustin Barrutia
 

Christopher,
I'm a Local DP in Argentina and flown dozen of times in domestic flights carrying pelican cases with several small Sony batteries and bigger Vmount batts as carry on Luggage with no issues in the past years. You might have issues with someone but its mostly because of misinformation on whats allowed and what not. If you stick to the rules, be polite and even carry the regulatory restrictions with you, you might avoid any issues that might happen.
Ground transport is the safest bet, and then if budget and time allows you might send backup batteries through ground transport and only carry with you whats necessary. Another option is sourcing batteries on your flying destiny. Where will you be shooting???

Let me know if I can be of any help with anything else, 

Cheers,

Agustín Barrutia (ADF)
Cinematographer
(+54911) 4069-5463
Bs. As. Argentina.
 

Christopher Rowe
 

Thanks to everyone who offered their advice on & off list. I've decided to leave my 150Wh batteries at home and take dockable 96Wh batteries instead, 3 pairs should be enough to get me through a day's shooting with the Amira. 150Wh batteries for the other cameras will be transported by ground.

 

Christopher Rowe
British DP, based in Berlin

Arri Amira Owner/Operator

chris@...



On 31.10.2018 18:23, Agustin Barrutia wrote:

Christopher,
I'm a Local DP in Argentina and flown dozen of times in domestic flights carrying pelican cases with several small Sony batteries and bigger Vmount batts as carry on Luggage with no issues in the past years. You might have issues with someone but its mostly because of misinformation on whats allowed and what not. If you stick to the rules, be polite and even carry the regulatory restrictions with you, you might avoid any issues that might happen.
Ground transport is the safest bet, and then if budget and time allows you might send backup batteries through ground transport and only carry with you whats necessary. Another option is sourcing batteries on your flying destiny. Where will you be shooting???