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help with ACS lens and camera collection

Thomas Gleeson
 

The ACS has a large collection of vintage lenses and cameras in its library. In the 35mm format there are these sets (below) that have piqued our interest and we are considering shooting some fun" tests with modern cameras.

Set of Super Baltars a 20,25,35,50 and100mm f2 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of Baltars 25,30,35,40,50,75 and 100mm f2.3 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of  Cooke Speed Panchros  28mm t2.3, 40mm f2.3, 75mm f2 with I think the Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1).  
An Angenieux Zoom 10x25 f3.0 with an Arri Standard mount.

 Also does anyone have thoughts on sourcing BNCR, Arri Std and Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1)s for modern cameras? The Eclair CA-1 with its shallow flange focal depth (17.52mm) may not be possible to use on modern cameras? Does anyone have an adaptor to fit any of this glass to a modern camera that we could borrow for a few days? We would organise, insure and pay any shipping if required?

We also have an Ikegami EC-35 with a Canon zoom and a wide prime. This camera from the early 1980s is of particular interest as it was the first electronic camera that I know of that attempted to cross an electronic camera into film production. There is also some sort of strange lens adaptor that we are unsure of its purpose. There is not much information online in regards to this machine. I have read it used 2/3” Plumbicon tubes so although it was called a EC35 it was not a 35mm format camera. The fact the zoom lens is a J15x8.5B points to the 2/3” format being correct? If it is a tube camera am I correct in thinking that there is no point powering this camera up as 35 years later the tubes would be defunct? 


 What lens mount does the EC35 use? Could I ask the CML Hive mind if anyone has information in regards to the Ikegami EC-35? I cannot make sense of the included lens adaptor if that is what it is? Is it a relay lens? Images below





Tom Gleeson
Sydney DOP and ACS member

 

  










Bob Kertesz
 

The EC35 was Ikegami's first (and only) foray into trying to build a video camera acceptable to film shooters in the early '80's.

It was a 3 tube 2/3" (plumbicon? saticon? don't remember) prism camera with 'automatic' setup and features designed to make film DPs feel all warm and fuzzy. Pretty much no adjustments available on the outside. It was painted black (a hammertone finish?) to look like film cameras, and Ikegami diddled the gammas a bit and had a rudimentary and somewhat crude knee circuit for highlight rolloff to make it more 'filmic'.

The adapter you have there is a relay lens designed to allow the use of some film lenses with certain types of mounts on the camera instead of the normal 2/3" compatible zooms (not sure B4 was a standard yet). It had an iris control because like all relay lenses, it looked like crap wide open.

Ikegami and the trade press were very vocal about how the camera would eliminate the video engineer and allow the DP to shoot just as if it were a film setup. The only problem with that was that the images out of it looked like shit if it wasn't set up properly, the 'automatic' circuitry did a poor job of that, and the very last group of production people on earth who had a clue about how to make it look better in 1982 were film DPs.

It had a very short life. There were only five or six sold (a few on each coast), and I can't imagine they did more than about 20 days shooting total between them. I did a couple of shoots with one, and compared to that era's actual 3 tube video cameras, it wasn't particularly good or particularly fast or filmic. It lacked a lot of the electronic handles required to actually make decent images, and what handles did exist were all on the inside and difficult to get to on set without stopping everything for half an hour or longer.

As for powering the thing up, nothing to lose, really. You might actually get a (NTSC?) composite video picture out of it. The tubes are no doubt gassy, but that just adds to the filmic look they were going for, I think. :-D

I do remember one rather well know older film DP (I was around 30) telling me on set that the camera was going to 'put you and your kind out of business'. And darned if he wasn't right. Here it is, 36 years and about 4,000 shooting days later, and I'm thinking about retiring.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

On 7/9/2018 8:08 PM, Thomas Gleeson via Cml.News wrote:
The ACS has a large collection of vintage lenses and cameras in its library. In the 35mm format there are these sets (below) that have piqued our interest and we are considering shooting some fun" tests with modern cameras.

Set of Super Baltars a 20,25,35,50 and100mm f2 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of Baltars 25,30,35,40,50,75 and 100mm f2.3 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of  Cooke Speed Panchros  28mm t2.3, 40mm f2.3, 75mm f2 with I think the Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1).  
An Angenieux Zoom 10x25 f3.0 with an Arri Standard mount.

 Also does anyone have thoughts on sourcing BNCR, Arri Std and Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1)s for modern cameras? The Eclair CA-1 with its shallow flange focal depth (17.52mm) may not be possible to use on modern cameras? Does anyone have an adaptor to fit any of this glass to a modern camera that we could borrow for a few days? We would organise, insure and pay any shipping if required?

We also have an Ikegami EC-35 with a Canon zoom and a wide prime. This camera from the early 1980s is of particular interest as it was the first electronic camera that I know of that attempted to cross an electronic camera into film production. There is also some sort of strange lens adaptor that we are unsure of its purpose. There is not much information online in regards to this machine. I have read it used 2/3” Plumbicon tubes so although it was called a EC35 it was not a 35mm format camera. The fact the zoom lens is a J15x8.5B points to the 2/3” format being correct? If it is a tube camera am I correct in thinking that there is no point powering this camera up as 35 years later the tubes would be defunct? 


 What lens mount does the EC35 use? Could I ask the CML Hive mind if anyone has information in regards to the Ikegami EC-35? I cannot make sense of the included lens adaptor if that is what it is? Is it a relay lens? Images below





Tom Gleeson
Sydney DOP and ACS member

 

 

Geoff Boyle
 

I had an EC 35 for a month or so, Ikegami loaned it to me at a time when I had three Sony cameras, bought from Thomson because of the way they set up the matrix.

It wasn't, for the time, a bad camera and i did consider buying them but they cost over twice the price of a regular camera and it didn't cost me that much to make the physical and electronic modification we needed to make standard cameras better.

Ikegamis biggest issue with this camera was greed.

Around the same time Panavision had their own attempt at a video camera which was interesting but they based it around a video camera that was unmitigated shit. The CEI camera was truly dreadful, memorable only for the Gary Numan music video Cars which exploited it's highlight lag as an effect!

cheers
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076
www.gboyle.co.uk


On Tue, 10 Jul 2018, 06:07 Bob Kertesz, <bob@...> wrote:
The EC35 was Ikegami's first (and only) foray into trying to build a video camera acceptable to film shooters in the early '80's.

It was a 3 tube 2/3" (plumbicon? saticon? don't remember) prism camera with 'automatic' setup and features designed to make film DPs feel all warm and fuzzy. Pretty much no adjustments available on the outside. It was painted black (a hammertone finish?) to look like film cameras, and Ikegami diddled the gammas a bit and had a rudimentary and somewhat crude knee circuit for highlight rolloff to make it more 'filmic'.

The adapter you have there is a relay lens designed to allow the use of some film lenses with certain types of mounts on the camera instead of the normal 2/3" compatible zooms (not sure B4 was a standard yet). It had an iris control because like all relay lenses, it looked like crap wide open.

Ikegami and the trade press were very vocal about how the camera would eliminate the video engineer and allow the DP to shoot just as if it were a film setup. The only problem with that was that the images out of it looked like shit if it wasn't set up properly, the 'automatic' circuitry did a poor job of that, and the very last group of production people on earth who had a clue about how to make it look better in 1982 were film DPs.

It had a very short life. There were only five or six sold (a few on each coast), and I can't imagine they did more than about 20 days shooting total between them. I did a couple of shoots with one, and compared to that era's actual 3 tube video cameras, it wasn't particularly good or particularly fast or filmic. It lacked a lot of the electronic handles required to actually make decent images, and what handles did exist were all on the inside and difficult to get to on set without stopping everything for half an hour or longer.

As for powering the thing up, nothing to lose, really. You might actually get a (NTSC?) composite video picture out of it. The tubes are no doubt gassy, but that just adds to the filmic look they were going for, I think. :-D

I do remember one rather well know older film DP (I was around 30) telling me on set that the camera was going to 'put you and your kind out of business'. And darned if he wasn't right. Here it is, 36 years and about 4,000 shooting days later, and I'm thinking about retiring.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

On 7/9/2018 8:08 PM, Thomas Gleeson via Cml.News wrote:
The ACS has a large collection of vintage lenses and cameras in its library. In the 35mm format there are these sets (below) that have piqued our interest and we are considering shooting some fun" tests with modern cameras.

Set of Super Baltars a 20,25,35,50 and100mm f2 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of Baltars 25,30,35,40,50,75 and 100mm f2.3 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of  Cooke Speed Panchros  28mm t2.3, 40mm f2.3, 75mm f2 with I think the Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1).  
An Angenieux Zoom 10x25 f3.0 with an Arri Standard mount.

 Also does anyone have thoughts on sourcing BNCR, Arri Std and Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1)s for modern cameras? The Eclair CA-1 with its shallow flange focal depth (17.52mm) may not be possible to use on modern cameras? Does anyone have an adaptor to fit any of this glass to a modern camera that we could borrow for a few days? We would organise, insure and pay any shipping if required?

We also have an Ikegami EC-35 with a Canon zoom and a wide prime. This camera from the early 1980s is of particular interest as it was the first electronic camera that I know of that attempted to cross an electronic camera into film production. There is also some sort of strange lens adaptor that we are unsure of its purpose. There is not much information online in regards to this machine. I have read it used 2/3” Plumbicon tubes so although it was called a EC35 it was not a 35mm format camera. The fact the zoom lens is a J15x8.5B points to the 2/3” format being correct? If it is a tube camera am I correct in thinking that there is no point powering this camera up as 35 years later the tubes would be defunct? 


 What lens mount does the EC35 use? Could I ask the CML Hive mind if anyone has information in regards to the Ikegami EC-35? I cannot make sense of the included lens adaptor if that is what it is? Is it a relay lens? Images below





Tom Gleeson
Sydney DOP and ACS member

 

 


Ted Langdell
 

The Museum of Broadcast Technology in Woonsocket, Rhode Island has a working EC35.

http://www.wmbt.org/

They had it on display making pictures at NAB 2016 along with a pair of RCA TK-45P portable cameras. 

Unfortunately my pictures show only a small corner of the camera. 

Their exhibit is traditionally in the hallway outside of the taxi area entrance to North Hall. Right next to the American Amateur Radio Relay League booth. 

In 2017 they had a pair of working RCATK 30/TK 34 Image Orthicon cameras. 

This year (2018) they had three working Ikegami HL-79E cameras feeding a switcher (Vision mixer) and a working Ampex AVR-2 2 inch quad machine. 

Ted

Ted Langdell
(530)301-2931

Dictated into and Sent from my iPhone, which is solely responsible for any weird stuff I didn't catch.

On Jul 9, 2018, at 10:06 PM, Bob Kertesz <bob@...> wrote:

The EC35 was Ikegami's first (and only) foray into trying to build a video camera acceptable to film shooters in the early '80's.

It was a 3 tube 2/3" (plumbicon? saticon? don't remember) prism camera with 'automatic' setup and features designed to make film DPs feel all warm and fuzzy. Pretty much no adjustments available on the outside. It was painted black (a hammertone finish?) to look like film cameras, and Ikegami diddled the gammas a bit and had a rudimentary and somewhat crude knee circuit for highlight rolloff to make it more 'filmic'.

The adapter you have there is a relay lens designed to allow the use of some film lenses with certain types of mounts on the camera instead of the normal 2/3" compatible zooms (not sure B4 was a standard yet). It had an iris control because like all relay lenses, it looked like crap wide open.

Ikegami and the trade press were very vocal about how the camera would eliminate the video engineer and allow the DP to shoot just as if it were a film setup. The only problem with that was that the images out of it looked like shit if it wasn't set up properly, the 'automatic' circuitry did a poor job of that, and the very last group of production people on earth who had a clue about how to make it look better in 1982 were film DPs.

It had a very short life. There were only five or six sold (a few on each coast), and I can't imagine they did more than about 20 days shooting total between them. I did a couple of shoots with one, and compared to that era's actual 3 tube video cameras, it wasn't particularly good or particularly fast or filmic. It lacked a lot of the electronic handles required to actually make decent images, and what handles did exist were all on the inside and difficult to get to on set without stopping everything for half an hour or longer.

As for powering the thing up, nothing to lose, really. You might actually get a (NTSC?) composite video picture out of it. The tubes are no doubt gassy, but that just adds to the filmic look they were going for, I think. :-D

I do remember one rather well know older film DP (I was around 30) telling me on set that the camera was going to 'put you and your kind out of business'. And darned if he wasn't right. Here it is, 36 years and about 4,000 shooting days later, and I'm thinking about retiring.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

On 7/9/2018 8:08 PM, Thomas Gleeson via Cml.News wrote:
The ACS has a large collection of vintage lenses and cameras in its library. In the 35mm format there are these sets (below) that have piqued our interest and we are considering shooting some fun" tests with modern cameras.

Set of Super Baltars a 20,25,35,50 and100mm f2 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of Baltars 25,30,35,40,50,75 and 100mm f2.3 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of  Cooke Speed Panchros  28mm t2.3, 40mm f2.3, 75mm f2 with I think the Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1).  
An Angenieux Zoom 10x25 f3.0 with an Arri Standard mount.

 Also does anyone have thoughts on sourcing BNCR, Arri Std and Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1)s for modern cameras? The Eclair CA-1 with its shallow flange focal depth (17.52mm) may not be possible to use on modern cameras? Does anyone have an adaptor to fit any of this glass to a modern camera that we could borrow for a few days? We would organise, insure and pay any shipping if required?

We also have an Ikegami EC-35 with a Canon zoom and a wide prime. This camera from the early 1980s is of particular interest as it was the first electronic camera that I know of that attempted to cross an electronic camera into film production. There is also some sort of strange lens adaptor that we are unsure of its purpose. There is not much information online in regards to this machine. I have read it used 2/3” Plumbicon tubes so although it was called a EC35 it was not a 35mm format camera. The fact the zoom lens is a J15x8.5B points to the 2/3” format being correct? If it is a tube camera am I correct in thinking that there is no point powering this camera up as 35 years later the tubes would be defunct? 


 What lens mount does the EC35 use? Could I ask the CML Hive mind if anyone has information in regards to the Ikegami EC-35? I cannot make sense of the included lens adaptor if that is what it is? Is it a relay lens? Images below





Tom Gleeson
Sydney DOP and ACS member

 

 


Thomas Gleeson
 

Bob and Geoff,

Thankyou for your replies. It doesn’t sound like the EC35 was a winner and was probably ahead of its time but as a “museum” piece the camera remains interesting. As far as the EC35 relay system goes I don’t recognise the mount on either end of it. 

Geoff I was completely unaware of the Panavision CEI camera. I assume it was this monstrosity ? Interesting you mention Thomson as they were great innovators and their LDK Betacams were the best of the bunch on their day IMHO. Their Viper camera was the next step towards electronic cinema cameras.

I would love to be able to download the manual for the EC35?

Tom “Your dreamin’ son” Gleeson
Sydney DOP
On 10 Jul 2018, at 3:06 pm, Bob Kertesz <bob@...> wrote:

The EC35 was Ikegami's first (and only) foray into trying to build a video camera acceptable to film shooters in the early '80's.

It was a 3 tube 2/3" (plumbicon? saticon? don't remember) prism camera with 'automatic' setup and features designed to make film DPs feel all warm and fuzzy. Pretty much no adjustments available on the outside. It was painted black (a hammertone finish?) to look like film cameras, and Ikegami diddled the gammas a bit and had a rudimentary and somewhat crude knee circuit for highlight rolloff to make it more 'filmic'.

The adapter you have there is a relay lens designed to allow the use of some film lenses with certain types of mounts on the camera instead of the normal 2/3" compatible zooms (not sure B4 was a standard yet). It had an iris control because like all relay lenses, it looked like crap wide open.

Ikegami and the trade press were very vocal about how the camera would eliminate the video engineer and allow the DP to shoot just as if it were a film setup. The only problem with that was that the images out of it looked like shit if it wasn't set up properly, the 'automatic' circuitry did a poor job of that, and the very last group of production people on earth who had a clue about how to make it look better in 1982 were film DPs.

It had a very short life. There were only five or six sold (a few on each coast), and I can't imagine they did more than about 20 days shooting total between them. I did a couple of shoots with one, and compared to that era's actual 3 tube video cameras, it wasn't particularly good or particularly fast or filmic. It lacked a lot of the electronic handles required to actually make decent images, and what handles did exist were all on the inside and difficult to get to on set without stopping everything for half an hour or longer.

As for powering the thing up, nothing to lose, really. You might actually get a (NTSC?) composite video picture out of it. The tubes are no doubt gassy, but that just adds to the filmic look they were going for, I think. :-D

I do remember one rather well know older film DP (I was around 30) telling me on set that the camera was going to 'put you and your kind out of business'. And darned if he wasn't right. Here it is, 36 years and about 4,000 shooting days later, and I'm thinking about retiring.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

On 7/9/2018 8:08 PM, Thomas Gleeson via Cml.News wrote:
The ACS has a large collection of vintage lenses and cameras in its library. In the 35mm format there are these sets (below) that have piqued our interest and we are considering shooting some fun" tests with modern cameras.

Set of Super Baltars a 20,25,35,50 and100mm f2 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of Baltars 25,30,35,40,50,75 and 100mm f2.3 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of  Cooke Speed Panchros  28mm t2.3, 40mm f2.3, 75mm f2 with I think the Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1).  
An Angenieux Zoom 10x25 f3.0 with an Arri Standard mount.

 Also does anyone have thoughts on sourcing BNCR, Arri Std and Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1)s for modern cameras? The Eclair CA-1 with its shallow flange focal depth (17.52mm) may not be possible to use on modern cameras? Does anyone have an adaptor to fit any of this glass to a modern camera that we could borrow for a few days? We would organise, insure and pay any shipping if required?

We also have an Ikegami EC-35 with a Canon zoom and a wide prime. This camera from the early 1980s is of particular interest as it was the first electronic camera that I know of that attempted to cross an electronic camera into film production. There is also some sort of strange lens adaptor that we are unsure of its purpose. There is not much information online in regards to this machine. I have read it used 2/3” Plumbicon tubes so although it was called a EC35 it was not a 35mm format camera. The fact the zoom lens is a J15x8.5B points to the 2/3” format being correct? If it is a tube camera am I correct in thinking that there is no point powering this camera up as 35 years later the tubes would be defunct? 


 What lens mount does the EC35 use? Could I ask the CML Hive mind if anyone has information in regards to the Ikegami EC-35? I cannot make sense of the included lens adaptor if that is what it is? Is it a relay lens? Images below





Tom Gleeson
Sydney DOP and ACS member
 
 


Geoff Boyle
 

No, it was a small camera, i can't remember the CEI model number but it was sold in Europe as an EMI camera, the 2008?



cheers
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076
www.gboyle.co.uk


On Tue, 10 Jul 2018, 07:37 Thomas Gleeson via Cml.News, <lensboy235=me.com@...> wrote:
Bob and Geoff,

Thankyou for your replies. It doesn’t sound like the EC35 was a winner and was probably ahead of its time but as a “museum” piece the camera remains interesting. As far as the EC35 relay system goes I don’t recognise the mount on either end of it. 

Geoff I was completely unaware of the Panavision CEI camera. I assume it was this monstrosity ? Interesting you mention Thomson as they were great innovators and their LDK Betacams were the best of the bunch on their day IMHO. Their Viper camera was the next step towards electronic cinema cameras.

I would love to be able to download the manual for the EC35?

Tom “Your dreamin’ son” Gleeson
Sydney DOP
On 10 Jul 2018, at 3:06 pm, Bob Kertesz <bob@...> wrote:

The EC35 was Ikegami's first (and only) foray into trying to build a video camera acceptable to film shooters in the early '80's.

It was a 3 tube 2/3" (plumbicon? saticon? don't remember) prism camera with 'automatic' setup and features designed to make film DPs feel all warm and fuzzy. Pretty much no adjustments available on the outside. It was painted black (a hammertone finish?) to look like film cameras, and Ikegami diddled the gammas a bit and had a rudimentary and somewhat crude knee circuit for highlight rolloff to make it more 'filmic'.

The adapter you have there is a relay lens designed to allow the use of some film lenses with certain types of mounts on the camera instead of the normal 2/3" compatible zooms (not sure B4 was a standard yet). It had an iris control because like all relay lenses, it looked like crap wide open.

Ikegami and the trade press were very vocal about how the camera would eliminate the video engineer and allow the DP to shoot just as if it were a film setup. The only problem with that was that the images out of it looked like shit if it wasn't set up properly, the 'automatic' circuitry did a poor job of that, and the very last group of production people on earth who had a clue about how to make it look better in 1982 were film DPs.

It had a very short life. There were only five or six sold (a few on each coast), and I can't imagine they did more than about 20 days shooting total between them. I did a couple of shoots with one, and compared to that era's actual 3 tube video cameras, it wasn't particularly good or particularly fast or filmic. It lacked a lot of the electronic handles required to actually make decent images, and what handles did exist were all on the inside and difficult to get to on set without stopping everything for half an hour or longer.

As for powering the thing up, nothing to lose, really. You might actually get a (NTSC?) composite video picture out of it. The tubes are no doubt gassy, but that just adds to the filmic look they were going for, I think. :-D

I do remember one rather well know older film DP (I was around 30) telling me on set that the camera was going to 'put you and your kind out of business'. And darned if he wasn't right. Here it is, 36 years and about 4,000 shooting days later, and I'm thinking about retiring.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

On 7/9/2018 8:08 PM, Thomas Gleeson via Cml.News wrote:
The ACS has a large collection of vintage lenses and cameras in its library. In the 35mm format there are these sets (below) that have piqued our interest and we are considering shooting some fun" tests with modern cameras.

Set of Super Baltars a 20,25,35,50 and100mm f2 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of Baltars 25,30,35,40,50,75 and 100mm f2.3 lenses with BNCR Mounts.
Set of  Cooke Speed Panchros  28mm t2.3, 40mm f2.3, 75mm f2 with I think the Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1).  
An Angenieux Zoom 10x25 f3.0 with an Arri Standard mount.

 Also does anyone have thoughts on sourcing BNCR, Arri Std and Cameflex mount (Eclair CA-1)s for modern cameras? The Eclair CA-1 with its shallow flange focal depth (17.52mm) may not be possible to use on modern cameras? Does anyone have an adaptor to fit any of this glass to a modern camera that we could borrow for a few days? We would organise, insure and pay any shipping if required?

We also have an Ikegami EC-35 with a Canon zoom and a wide prime. This camera from the early 1980s is of particular interest as it was the first electronic camera that I know of that attempted to cross an electronic camera into film production. There is also some sort of strange lens adaptor that we are unsure of its purpose. There is not much information online in regards to this machine. I have read it used 2/3” Plumbicon tubes so although it was called a EC35 it was not a 35mm format camera. The fact the zoom lens is a J15x8.5B points to the 2/3” format being correct? If it is a tube camera am I correct in thinking that there is no point powering this camera up as 35 years later the tubes would be defunct? 


 What lens mount does the EC35 use? Could I ask the CML Hive mind if anyone has information in regards to the Ikegami EC-35? I cannot make sense of the included lens adaptor if that is what it is? Is it a relay lens? Images below





Tom Gleeson
Sydney DOP and ACS member
 
 


Aleksei Vanamois
 

Hey Tom,

I remember lugging the thing in to FSM for a clean up. Bernie ex CH9 broadcast engineer nearly fell off his chair. He used to tune the thing every time they powered it up. It took about two hours to get a decent picture after trimming about 30 trim pots.

 

The mount is an interesting one. I'm happy to volunteer to remove the considerable amount of fungus that's built up on the glass if it can be adapted.

Aleksei Vanamois - Sydney Australia
[ DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY ]
-------------------------------------------------
M +61 (0) 405 679 291
E dp@...
www.alekeivanamois.com
-------------------------------------------------
Follow me on Instagram!

 

Aleksei Vanamois
 

These guys have lots of rehousing option$$$.

https://www.truelens.co.uk/-tls-super-baltar-rehousing-process?deptID=9&subID=22

https://www.truelens.co.uk/tls-cooke-speed-panchro-rehousing-process?deptID=9&subID=17

Oh, and another considerably cheaper option for your Monstro:

https://c7adapters.com/en/product/bncr_-_red/18

Sony E-Mount for the Camflex

https://c7adapters.com/en/product/cameflex_-_e-mount/168

ARRI Alexa:

https://c7adapters.com/en/product/bncr_-_alexa/192

A

Aleksei Vanamois - Sydney Australia
[ DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY ]
-------------------------------------------------
M +61 (0) 405 679 291
E dp@...
www.alekeivanamois.com
-------------------------------------------------
Follow me on Instagram!

andyrmail@...
 

The Panavision camera you guys are talking about was made from a CEI 310 mated to an optical relay system that permitted the use of PV mount lenses at the proper field of view. Here's Bob Gottschalks rationale for the camera https://www.questia.com/magazine/1P3-1504270481/panacam-reflex
somewhere I have a copy of the field handbook and if I find it I'll post a link to it. Thank god I don't have one of the cameras although as it was a PV design it looked kinda pretty.
I can tell you many tales but the takeaway is that it doesn't pay to be too far ahead of your time,
Andy
Andy Romanoff
one picture at a time and sometimes a few words
Headed to the airport and Rhinebeck NY

Rod Williams
 

Oh, Gawd! The Panacam. I still have a Panavision marketing brochure for that hateful thing and maybe a basic manual. In the late ‘70s and ‘80s I worked for a big deal production company in San Francisco that was known for being innovative. All the manufactures would send us their latest stuff to demo. Both Ikigami and Panavision loaned us those respective cameras. Most of us in the production department were from a film background and, as a group, we realized that both Ikigami and Panavision were out to lunch regarding how to appeal to hard-core “I don’t like video” DPs and directors. Those two cameras were horrible. (we also got the Nagra / Ampex VPR-5 portable 1” video recorder. Oy veh!)

Rod Williams
First Camera Assistant (Retired)
Petaluma, CA 94952
(415) 309-3407

On Jul 10, 2018, at 7:37 AM, andyrmail@... wrote:

The Panavision camera you guys are talking about was made from a CEI 310 mated to an optical relay system that permitted the use of PV mount lenses at the proper field of view.

Steve Oakley
 

I was in partial possession of a EC35 back when I was in NY at a TV studio out on long island, circa 1996-2000. I had it out of the case a few times but we never fired it up. it may of well been working. Mostly I was interested the lense support stuff - matte box, rails, FF. It had a bunch of 138mm round filters that I did manage to keep and still occasionally use. After a couple years there I left that studio to open my own edit / production facility 2 miles away.

Now the rest of the story. They had a _really_ stupid kid working there sometimes. This kid ( a 20 somethiing ) cleaned out a space for a new audio room that had been for engineering and repairs. Amongst the things he threw out : a pair of new in the box sony paint boxes, one of which I’d occasionally borrow for use on my own camera and then put back. countless other good things also thrown. About a year or so after I left that studio, a DP / gaffer ( I mean lead lighting tech ) who worked there freelance, and knew the camera was sitting in a storage space, told be that space had been cleaned out. Yup, piece of history thrown out again :(

If I had *any* clue they were that rare, I would of taken it, but it technically wasn’t mine… BTW that studio was the same place HBO got started by showing 16mm films into a telecine.

Steve Oakley
DP / Editor / Colorist / VFX Artist
Madison & Milwaukee WI
920 544 2230

Bob Kertesz
 

No, it was a small camera, i can't remember the CEI model number but
it was sold in Europe as an EMI camera, the 2008?
In the U.S., I'm pretty sure it was the CEI 310 that Panavision
attempted to make into a 'filmic video camera'.

http://www.tvcameramuseum.org/cei/310/cei310p1.html

I was very familiar with the original camera at the time, having had a
client who owned two - shot with it regularly on their stage. It was
just OK, even for that time. Just OK. Panavising it didn't improve
things one iota.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted
them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

David Brillhart
 

The CEI was small.  But I recall, having crewed with it at Ronald Reagan's inauguration, it was cabled to a "portable" CCU unit and a one-inch "portable" recorder.  At the time, it was touted as the best "portable" broadcast system available.  That and the station wagon needed to move it from set to set.

David Brillhart
Sacramento

steadirob@...
 

I noticed an interesting / funny slip of the type-writer in the 3rd alinea: 

Rob Erik van Gelder
Head of maintenance  / international contacts
Lighthouse Film Service
Bangkok, Thailand

Mako Koiwai
 

The PanaCam metering system was kind of neat. One could change the position of the sampling sites if I recall correctly. I remember seeing one where the points were scattered around, principally “in the ground,” with some scattered above the horizon, in the sky.

Do I have that right?

I’m trying to remember. Focus Aid via Peaking … white outline around what was in-focus. Typically too broad. Worked OK on tight close-ups?

makofoto, Ret. S. Pasadena, CA

Thomas Gleeson
 

Aleksei,

Thankyou for your kind offer on the lens but we are unlikely to ever attempt to bring the EC-35 back to working order. The lens is interesting but with 2/3’ coverage not sure its really worth the effort especially with the its non standard mount. Do you know what the hell the mount is on the EC35? Uncertain what mounts were used on video cameras before 1994 with the introduction of the B4 mount. Aleksei if you want to come and play with us on these test you are more than welcome.

Tom “old but not that old” Gleeson
Sydney DOP

Jeff Kreines
 

recall that around this time Cinema Products was attempting to market an NEC camera to the “low-res-electronic-cinema” market.

Anyone else remember this?  

Jeff Kreines
Kinetta
jeff@...
kinetta.com


R


Bob Kertesz
 

On 7/10/2018 7:01 PM, Jeff Kreines wrote:
recall that around this time Cinema Products was attempting to market an NEC camera to the “low-res-electronic-cinema” market.

Anyone else remember this?  


I did remember something about that when I saw your post, actually remember being called in to have a look at it, but everything else about it has slipped away. As I recall, it never went anywhere.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted them or not.©

* * * * * * * * * *

Steven Bradford
 

Yes, I used this one. 
CP donated  2 or 3 to USC in 1981, and these are what we used for our final projects in the first years of the mixed technology film/tv major at USC cinema. The story was they were leftover stock from CP’s failed venture into video when everyone in news stopped buying CP16s and switched to the RCA and Ikegami ENG cameras instead.

As I remember they were easy to use for students and worked probably as well as any other high end ENG camera of the time. By low res, I take it you mean standard def NTSC. There were about 500 lines, and easy to use and set up, with out a lot of drift, just the normal centering chart and white balance at the beginning of the day. Pretty similar to a TK76 or HL77.  We did mainly night shooting with lights with it, and were happy with the results for a dramatic production.  That being said for all of us we didn’t really have much to measure it against as it was considerably higher end than any of us had experience with before that as far a video cameras were concerned.
There were a LOT of companies trying to sell into the high end ENG market at the time, understandable as the cameras cost as much as a house in many parts of the US at the time. (US$40K+)

Steven Bradford
Cinematographer / Instructor
Seattle - US

On Jul 10, 2018, at 7:01 PM, Jeff Kreines <jeff@...> wrote:

recall that around this time Cinema Products was attempting to market an NEC camera to the “low-res-electronic-cinema” market.

Anyone else remember this?  

Jeff Kreines
Kinetta
jeff@...
kinetta.com


R


Jeff Kreines
 

There’s an ad here. But I think this was their ENG camera and they also tried to introduce a higher end EFP camera. 

On Jul 11, 2018, at 9:20 PM, Steven Bradford <bradford@...> wrote:

Yes, I used this one. 
CP donated  2 or 3 to USC in 1981, and these are what we used for our final projects in the first years of the mixed technology film/tv major at USC cinema. The story was they were leftover stock from CP’s failed venture into video when everyone in news stopped buying CP16s and switched to the RCA and Ikegami ENG cameras instead.

As I remember they were easy to use for students and worked probably as well as any other high end ENG camera of the time. By low res, I take it you mean standard def NTSC. There were about 500 lines, and easy to use and set up, with out a lot of drift, just the normal centering chart and white balance at the beginning of the day. Pretty similar to a TK76 or HL77.  We did mainly night shooting with lights with it, and were happy with the results for a dramatic production.  That being said for all of us we didn’t really have much to measure it against as it was considerably higher end than any of us had experience with before that as far a video cameras were concerned.
There were a LOT of companies trying to sell into the high end ENG market at the time, understandable as the cameras cost as much as a house in many parts of the US at the time. (US$40K+)

Steven Bradford
Cinematographer / Instructor
Seattle - US

On Jul 10, 2018, at 7:01 PM, Jeff Kreines <jeff@...> wrote:

recall that around this time Cinema Products was attempting to market an NEC camera to the “low-res-electronic-cinema” market.

Anyone else remember this?  

Jeff Kreines
Kinetta
jeff@...
kinetta.com


R