Topics

Information or Knowledge?

Geoff Boyle
 

When I started CML I wanted to exchange information to expand knowledge, I fear that knowledge is being discarded for information and understanding of the difference is being lost…

 

It's becoming clear to me that there is a huge confusion between information and knowledge.

Whilst I love the net it is creating a major problem in that by making so much information available so easily a lot of people think that by looking up information on the net they can "know" something.

This is just not true, truly "knowing" something implies understanding and being able to balance one source of information against other source of information and use experience to come to a reasoned and comprehensive understanding of an issue.

It is often possible to get information on the net that "proves" a point of view when in fact on closer examination and filtered through experience it actually proves the opposite.

When I'm teaching workshops and also posting on the net I'm often asked for a reference for what I'm saying. The problem here is what I am saying is based upon 50 years of experience. I'm sure some of that experience is based upon things I have read or seen along the way but specific references? get real! Generally if anyone can be bothered to research deeply enough they can find an actual reference :-)

The biggest differences between information and knowledge are speed, depth and breadth. I don't need to look up what the foot candle or lux level of lighting is needed to get a T stop of 8 with EI speed 400 and a shutter of 180, I just know it. I also understand the implications and variables that come from that aperture and shutter angle and what possibilities there are. When I say that I generally expose camera X at an EI of 250 it's not arbitrary or the result of looking it up on the net. It's from years of experience and the knowledge of balancing what is best for shooting and what is best for post along with dozens of other variables.

There is no shortcut, it takes time to assimilate enough information and experience to truly have knowledge of it.

Not acknowledging this will lead to incorrect assumptions, embarrassment and pain.

 

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Netherlands

www.gboyle.nl

 

Mitch Gross
 

200fc. 

😎

Mitch Gross
Cinema Product Manager 
Panasonic Systems Solutions Company of North America
New York

On Jun 24, 2018, at 2:47 AM, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

When I started CML I wanted to exchange information to expand knowledge, I fear that knowledge is being discarded for information and understanding of the difference is being lost…

 

It's becoming clear to me that there is a huge confusion between information and knowledge.

Whilst I love the net it is creating a major problem in that by making so much information available so easily a lot of people think that by looking up information on the net they can "know" something.

This is just not true, truly "knowing" something implies understanding and being able to balance one source of information against other source of information and use experience to come to a reasoned and comprehensive understanding of an issue.

It is often possible to get information on the net that "proves" a point of view when in fact on closer examination and filtered through experience it actually proves the opposite.

When I'm teaching workshops and also posting on the net I'm often asked for a reference for what I'm saying. The problem here is what I am saying is based upon 50 years of experience. I'm sure some of that experience is based upon things I have read or seen along the way but specific references? get real! Generally if anyone can be bothered to research deeply enough they can find an actual reference :-)

The biggest differences between information and knowledge are speed, depth and breadth. I don't need to look up what the foot candle or lux level of lighting is needed to get a T stop of 8 with EI speed 400 and a shutter of 180, I just know it. I also understand the implications and variables that come from that aperture and shutter angle and what possibilities there are. When I say that I generally expose camera X at an EI of 250 it's not arbitrary or the result of looking it up on the net. It's from years of experience and the knowledge of balancing what is best for shooting and what is best for post along with dozens of other variables.

There is no shortcut, it takes time to assimilate enough information and experience to truly have knowledge of it.

Not acknowledging this will lead to incorrect assumptions, embarrassment and pain.

 

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Netherlands

www.gboyle.nl

 

Merritt Mullen
 

I agree Geoff — it has always drives me nuts when someone follows some advice they’ve picked up somewhere without understanding WHY they should be doing that. Too often you meet some student who diffuses a light through some diffusion gel or uses some camera filter because some famous cinematographer does it that way, but they don’t understand the principle behind the technique.

David Mullen, ASC
Los Angeles

Paul Richards
 

A fortnight at F8!

Paul Richards
+6421959555

On 24/06/2018, at 18:55, Mitch Gross <mitchgrosscml@...> wrote:

200fc. 

😎

Mitch Gross
Cinema Product Manager 
Panasonic Systems Solutions Company of North America
New York

On Jun 24, 2018, at 2:47 AM, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

When I started CML I wanted to exchange information to expand knowledge, I fear that knowledge is being discarded for information and understanding of the difference is being lost…

 

It's becoming clear to me that there is a huge confusion between information and knowledge.

Whilst I love the net it is creating a major problem in that by making so much information available so easily a lot of people think that by looking up information on the net they can "know" something.

This is just not true, truly "knowing" something implies understanding and being able to balance one source of information against other source of information and use experience to come to a reasoned and comprehensive understanding of an issue.

It is often possible to get information on the net that "proves" a point of view when in fact on closer examination and filtered through experience it actually proves the opposite.

When I'm teaching workshops and also posting on the net I'm often asked for a reference for what I'm saying. The problem here is what I am saying is based upon 50 years of experience. I'm sure some of that experience is based upon things I have read or seen along the way but specific references? get real! Generally if anyone can be bothered to research deeply enough they can find an actual reference :-)

The biggest differences between information and knowledge are speed, depth and breadth. I don't need to look up what the foot candle or lux level of lighting is needed to get a T stop of 8 with EI speed 400 and a shutter of 180, I just know it. I also understand the implications and variables that come from that aperture and shutter angle and what possibilities there are. When I say that I generally expose camera X at an EI of 250 it's not arbitrary or the result of looking it up on the net. It's from years of experience and the knowledge of balancing what is best for shooting and what is best for post along with dozens of other variables.

There is no shortcut, it takes time to assimilate enough information and experience to truly have knowledge of it.

Not acknowledging this will lead to incorrect assumptions, embarrassment and pain.

 

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Netherlands

www.gboyle.nl

 

Tony Ngai
 

Geoff:

May I have ur permission to post this important viewpoint on CCML too ?


Tony Ngai 魏天明 
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On 24 Jun 2018, at 2:47 PM, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

When I started CML I wanted to exchange information to expand knowledge, I fear that knowledge is being discarded for information and understanding of the difference is being lost…

 

It's becoming clear to me that there is a huge confusion between information and knowledge.

Whilst I love the net it is creating a major problem in that by making so much information available so easily a lot of people think that by looking up information on the net they can "know" something.

This is just not true, truly "knowing" something implies understanding and being able to balance one source of information against other source of information and use experience to come to a reasoned and comprehensive understanding of an issue.

It is often possible to get information on the net that "proves" a point of view when in fact on closer examination and filtered through experience it actually proves the opposite.

When I'm teaching workshops and also posting on the net I'm often asked for a reference for what I'm saying. The problem here is what I am saying is based upon 50 years of experience. I'm sure some of that experience is based upon things I have read or seen along the way but specific references? get real! Generally if anyone can be bothered to research deeply enough they can find an actual reference :-)

The biggest differences between information and knowledge are speed, depth and breadth. I don't need to look up what the foot candle or lux level of lighting is needed to get a T stop of 8 with EI speed 400 and a shutter of 180, I just know it. I also understand the implications and variables that come from that aperture and shutter angle and what possibilities there are. When I say that I generally expose camera X at an EI of 250 it's not arbitrary or the result of looking it up on the net. It's from years of experience and the knowledge of balancing what is best for shooting and what is best for post along with dozens of other variables.

There is no shortcut, it takes time to assimilate enough information and experience to truly have knowledge of it.

Not acknowledging this will lead to incorrect assumptions, embarrassment and pain.

 

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Netherlands

www.gboyle.nl

 


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Andy Jarosz
 

This is a GDC talk, from the gaming dev industry, but It honestly
changed a lot of how I view advice and "tips" in a way that is
definitely in line what what everyone is saying here. I completely
agree, and it's easy to see--if you're brave enough for YouTube
comments, it's not hard to find people asking "can you do a tutorial on
X" where X is something incredibly specific. More and more people seem
to want nuggets of information, being told what to do rather than being
given a starting point to expand upon.

All Advice Is Bad:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miwrDpbb25Q&feature=youtu.be&t=2686

The solution might simply be the way of how information is presented.
Rather than saying "10 ways to improve your lighting," we could be
saying "10 techniques to try."


Andy Jarosz

MadlyFX Special Effects

708.420.2639

Chicago, IL


On 6/24/2018 2:26 AM, Merritt Mullen wrote:
I agree Geoff — it has always drives me nuts when someone follows some
advice they’ve picked up somewhere without understanding WHY they
should be doing that. Too often you meet some student who diffuses a
light through some diffusion gel or uses some camera filter because
some famous cinematographer does it that way, but they don’t
understand the principle behind the technique.

Geoff Boyle
 

I love this 😊

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Netherlands

www.gboyle.nl

 

From: cml-general@... <cml-general@...> On Behalf Of Andy Jarosz


All Advice Is Bad:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=miwrDpbb25Q&feature=youtu.be&t=2686

The solution might simply be the way of how information is presented.
Rather than saying "10 ways to improve your lighting," we could be
saying "10 techniques to try."


._,_