Topics

Protecting your camera rig from your rain rig

Nick LaRovere <contact@...>
 

Hello everyone!

I'm doing an overnight shoot the night of May 1st. The catch is the entire night consists of rain scenes, and I'm using a rain rig (albeit DIY) that will be pouring on us all through the night.

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

For context, we are mostly going to be on sticks and Dana dolly, with a bit of shoulder mount. We will definitely be in the 'blast radius' of the rain rig for quite a few shots, if not directly in the rain.
We are shooting on a Sony FS700 + Odyssey 7Q+ and all rigged up with Matte Box, V-mount, etc.

I appreciate any and all ideas or information. Thank you!

Next time sign your message with your name, job and location or it will be rejected

Mark Sasahara
 

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

Nick,

Sometimes it's as simple as a heavy duty plastic trash bag. If I am covering the camera, to protect against any disaster, I will throw a heavy duty garbage bag, or camera specific plastic bag over the camera, on the tripod. I always keep a couple of garbage bags in my kit, Just In Case. For breaks, like lunch, I have my red/silver Space Blanket, to keep things in order.

If you are using a trash bag, cut a hole in the bottom, sealed end of the bag for the lens, then put your hand up the open end to operate the camera, or seal it shut with a rubber band, etc. Bongo Ties, Tape, etc. A big bath towel works in a pinch as well. If you are getting sounds of rain hitting the trash bag, the towel on top of the bag, deadens the sound of rain drops hitting the trash bag. You can also use Visqueen, or other heavy plastic sheeting. Your local home improvement store sells heavy duty trash bags, plastic and fabric painter's cloths and other things, that can be re-purposed as camera covers. Thicker plastic is usually better. Heck, even a rain poncho works great.

The grip department can also provide things like 4x4, or 6x6 Griff, UltraBounce, or other rags to protect the camera from the elements.

Best,

-Mark




Mark Sasahara
  marksasahara@...
   718-440-1013
    http://msasahara.com


On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 10:34 PM, Nick LaRovere <contact@...> wrote:
Hello everyone!

I'm doing an overnight shoot the night of May 1st. The catch is the entire night consists of rain scenes, and I'm using a rain rig (albeit DIY) that will be pouring on us all through the night.

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

For context, we are mostly going to be on sticks and Dana dolly, with a bit of shoulder mount. We will definitely be in the 'blast radius' of the rain rig for quite a few shots, if not directly in the rain.
We are shooting on a Sony FS700 + Odyssey 7Q+ and all rigged up with Matte Box, V-mount, etc.

I appreciate any and all ideas or information. Thank you!

Next time sign your message with your name, job and location or it will be rejected

Srini Madhavan
 

Nick,

I worked on a music video two weeks ago with the same scenario (recreating rain, camera certain to get wet). 

In addition to following all of Mark’s pointers, I would also encourage production to hire a Schulz “Sprayoff Micro” which is a spinning rain deflector that slots into a couple of matte box filter trays. Runs off 12v/24v power and really reduced my concerns as a camera assistant about water on the front element of the lens. 

Hope that helps. 

Cheers,
Srini Madhavan
Camera Assistant
Melbourne, Australia


On 25 Apr 2018, at 1:21 pm, Mark Sasahara <marksasahara@...> wrote:

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

Nick,

Sometimes it's as simple as a heavy duty plastic trash bag. If I am covering the camera, to protect against any disaster, I will throw a heavy duty garbage bag, or camera specific plastic bag over the camera, on the tripod. I always keep a couple of garbage bags in my kit, Just In Case. For breaks, like lunch, I have my red/silver Space Blanket, to keep things in order.

If you are using a trash bag, cut a hole in the bottom, sealed end of the bag for the lens, then put your hand up the open end to operate the camera, or seal it shut with a rubber band, etc. Bongo Ties, Tape, etc. A big bath towel works in a pinch as well. If you are getting sounds of rain hitting the trash bag, the towel on top of the bag, deadens the sound of rain drops hitting the trash bag. You can also use Visqueen, or other heavy plastic sheeting. Your local home improvement store sells heavy duty trash bags, plastic and fabric painter's cloths and other things, that can be re-purposed as camera covers. Thicker plastic is usually better. Heck, even a rain poncho works great.

The grip department can also provide things like 4x4, or 6x6 Griff, UltraBounce, or other rags to protect the camera from the elements.

Best,

-Mark




Mark Sasahara
  marksasahara@...
   718-440-1013
    http://msasahara.com


On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 10:34 PM, Nick LaRovere <contact@...> wrote:
Hello everyone!

I'm doing an overnight shoot the night of May 1st. The catch is the entire night consists of rain scenes, and I'm using a rain rig (albeit DIY) that will be pouring on us all through the night.

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

For context, we are mostly going to be on sticks and Dana dolly, with a bit of shoulder mount. We will definitely be in the 'blast radius' of the rain rig for quite a few shots, if not directly in the rain.
We are shooting on a Sony FS700 + Odyssey 7Q+ and all rigged up with Matte Box, V-mount, etc.

I appreciate any and all ideas or information. Thank you!

Next time sign your message with your name, job and location or it will be rejected


rich
 

A spin tech rain deflector with an attached raincoat is good
I have used it a number of times with trouble free results

rich lerner
use based dp



Steve Oakley
 

as rain and snow are regular things I deal with…

CLEAR plastic garbage bags are the first choice. You can see controls. Black is the worst. You can also use them to cover LED lights with the plastic giving a touch of diffusion. While dedicated camera rain coats are ok, I’d only recommend them for full size ENG or studio cams because they work best there. They aren’t always reasonably water proof either because of access holes, and can be super fiddly to put on. I tend to use them more for snow than rain where I’ll go to a plastic bag as simpler, faster, easier and always in the camera case.

Put the bag on upside down straight onto the camera from the top. cut a tiny opening for the lens and pull it open just enough to put the lens thru, or matte box. tape sealed. Ditto VF if you are using one. the bottom being open lets you put your hands in, get on / off tripod easily. 

Minimize wires going to external things because those wires, besides the usual trip / pull hazard can also let water in - water runs down the cable to ….

Watch for fogging of gear, microfiber towels are handy.

If there is wind, big fans, wind blown water will get in. just be ready for it. snow is worse for this, then it melts once inside :( A flag can be used to help block which you can wrap in a bag.

quality clear or UV filter. 

As for water on the lens, depends on angles, wind. Matte box + top flag may do the job just fine. Extra lens wipes.

Extra apple boxes, full 1/2’s or 1/2 fulls are fine to put ANY power connections,  power supplies for lights, ballasts off the ground and out of puddles. extra safety when mixing electricity and water.

Folding 10X10 canopy tent ( preferably with at least one side ) or two for sound dept, monitors, people.

Steve Oakley
DP / Editor / Colorist / VFX Artist
Madison & Milwaukee WI
920 544 2230


On Apr 24, 2018, at 10:21 PM, Mark Sasahara <marksasahara@...> wrote:

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

Nick,

Sometimes it's as simple as a heavy duty plastic trash bag. If I am covering the camera, to protect against any disaster, I will throw a heavy duty garbage bag, or camera specific plastic bag over the camera, on the tripod. I always keep a couple of garbage bags in my kit, Just In Case. For breaks, like lunch, I have my red/silver Space Blanket, to keep things in order. 

If you are using a trash bag, cut a hole in the bottom, sealed end of the bag for the lens, then put your hand up the open end to operate the camera, or seal it shut with a rubber band, etc. Bongo Ties, Tape, etc. A big bath towel works in a pinch as well. If you are getting sounds of rain hitting the trash bag, the towel on top of the bag, deadens the sound of rain drops hitting the trash bag. You can also use Visqueen, or other heavy plastic sheeting. Your local home improvement store sells heavy duty trash bags, plastic and fabric painter's cloths and other things, that can be re-purposed as camera covers. Thicker plastic is usually better. Heck, even a rain poncho works great.

The grip department can also provide things like 4x4, or 6x6 Griff, UltraBounce, or other rags to protect the camera from the elements.

Best,

-Mark




Mark Sasahara
  marksasahara@...
   718-440-1013
    http://msasahara.com


On Tue, Apr 24, 2018 at 10:34 PM, Nick LaRovere <contact@...> wrote:
Hello everyone!

I'm doing an overnight shoot the night of May 1st. The catch is the entire night consists of rain scenes, and I'm using a rain rig (albeit DIY) that will be pouring on us all through the night.

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

For context, we are mostly going to be on sticks and Dana dolly, with a bit of shoulder mount. We will definitely be in the 'blast radius' of the rain rig for quite a few shots, if not directly in the rain.
We are shooting on a Sony FS700 + Odyssey 7Q+ and all rigged up with Matte Box, V-mount, etc.

I appreciate any and all ideas or information. Thank you!

Next time sign your message with your name, job and location or it will be rejected



Matthew Clark
 

I’ve been a big fan of making my own covers out of clear shower curtains.  They are inexpensive, thick and even accept stick on velcro to work around the mattebox.  Pair this with the spinning rain deflector and you are golden.  I used this set up on a very cold and rainy set where we made lots of rain and the camera was on a crane.  We had to have two grips pushing down on the crane bucket to get it to rise through the rain… and the camera stayed dry.  

We do a lot of rain work up here in the Pacific Northwest and often times, in light rain, we just run with waterproof floppies over the camera and generally we are good.  But when it gets heavy, the shower curtain is much better, IMO, then a trash bag because it is more rigid but still pliable enough to make it go where you want.


Matthew J. Clark
Director/DP 
Seattle, WA
www.StraightEIGHTFilms.com

Mark Sasahara
 

I’ve been a big fan of making my own covers out of clear shower curtains.

That's such a great idea! Thanks Matthew! What do you use for adhesive, snot tape, or foam tape, multiple adhesives?

Mark Sasahara, DP, NYC
  marksasahara@...
   718-440-1013
    http://msasahara.com



Matthew Clark
 


That's such a great idea! Thanks Matthew! What do you use for adhesive, snot tape, or foam tape, multiple adhesives?

I can’t take credit for it.  One of my camera assistants uses them frequently and I basically took the idea and ran with it.  

No, we don’t adhere it.  We just use #1 grip clips, binder clips, clothes pins or the velcro to snug it up.  Basically, draping it over the camera then securing from underneath but still allowing room for hands, cables and the head to work from underneath.  Much like the garbage bag or visqueen or plastic wrap idea.  Thinking about plastic wrap, a few assistants I work with, from time to time, use plastic wrap to put on their onboard monitor for a simple, fast way to protect them from moisture - moisture or light rain, not real precipitation.  We often have days of light, misty nearly rain, but not real rain…and it lasts for weeks on end.  


Matthew J. Clark
Director/DP 
Seattle, WA
www.StraightEIGHTFilms.com

Mako Koiwai
 

If you aren’t going to use a spinner at least treat an optical flat with Rain-X. Done properly drops will instantly sheet instead of forming droplets.

I would have a couple, pre-treated. Again, done correctly there should be no reason to have to wipe them, but if you do, have the back-up ready. Then redo the first one.

There are also these hard to find water repelling filters. I believe Hoya also makes them? 

Stefan Knapp
 

Hey Nick,

As a basic concept nothing goes over the custom-cut polybag (or any thick, translucent plastic bag) and a spray-off on your matte box.

I have had issues with that setup and recording dialogue though. Particularly the spray off sounds like someone is running a small table saw next your camera. And depending on the quality of your raindrops and your plastic bag it can be very prominent on the soundtrack, too. 

Just as a last resort: have a roll of saran/plastic wrap on standby. We use it primarily on the Steadicam so viewfinder etc might be a bit of a hassle, and getting it on/off the camera isn't as easy too, but it's as wind and soundproof as it gets. 

Best wishes and a great shoot, 

Stefan Knapp 
SteadicamOp&AC
+491637378738 

On Wed, 25 Apr 2018, 04:56 Nick LaRovere, <contact@...> wrote:
Hello everyone!

I'm doing an overnight shoot the night of May 1st. The catch is the entire night consists of rain scenes, and I'm using a rain rig (albeit DIY) that will be pouring on us all through the night.

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up and keep it safe?

For context, we are mostly going to be on sticks and Dana dolly, with a bit of shoulder mount. We will definitely be in the 'blast radius' of the rain rig for quite a few shots, if not directly in the rain.
We are shooting on a Sony FS700 + Odyssey 7Q+ and all rigged up with Matte Box, V-mount, etc.

I appreciate any and all ideas or information. Thank you!

Next time sign your message with your name, job and location or it will be rejected

Matt Brown
 

What's the best way, in your experience, to wrap our camera package up
and keep it safe?
At HydroFlex we offer a variety of splashbags, some specific to cameras
and some generic.  Except for a cable sleeve to pass cables through,
they are completely sealed with waterproof zippers to easily access the
camera for adjustments & lens/card/batt changes.  There is room in them
for remote lens systems and wireless transmitters.  They have built in
air powered spray deflectors over an o-ring sealed optical flat in front
of the lens.  The air can also be diverted to the interior to avoid fogging.

For just a quick shot or two when your camera is in danger it may be
easier to throw a shower curtain over it, but for a full day or more of
shooting with rain, snow, or ocean spray (or sand for that matter!)
there's no easier or safer way to fully protect the camera.

BTW, we're open to any and all feedback from CMLers who have used our
splashbags... always room for improvement!

Matt Brown
HydroFlex, Inc.
Underwater Camera and Lighting Systems
Los Angeles, CA
(310) 301 8187
www.hydroflex.com

Mark Weingartner, ASC
 

At the other end of the spectrum for some water protection /quick deployment/small footprint Wayne Baker turned me on to dry cleaner clothing bags - wadded up they’ll fit in a pocket - drop over the camera - easy enough to get the lens, eyepiece, pan handle etc through by poking a hole with your finger.

Totally disposable… likely not to last more than a few setups but no rustling, no weight, etc

Also good as a quick splash protection where they are doing wet-downs or whatever

weingartner
la based dp etc

Steven Gruen
 

Camrade makes a wetsuit for the FS700.

https://www.camrade.com/products/protection/raincovers/wetsuit-nex-fs700

I don't think there is room inside it for the Odyssey.

Steven Gruen
Filmmaker
Paris, France

Nick LaRovere <contact@...>
 

Everyone,

I want to thank you for taking the time to offer your advice and input regarding my shoot and protecting our camera!

Really, I greatly appreciate it. You offer something great to the community by having open discussions and offering information freely. CML people are always generous with their advice to me.

Regarding the camera and its protection:
For shots where the camera was in the rain, we simply placed clear plastic sheeting over the camera, leaving the matte box partially exposed. Our DP and AC stood underneath the plastic sheeting as necessary to pull focus, etc.
We added an umbrella on a c-stand when needed to add additional coverage over the lens, tilted toward the rain, a bit past camera, and as close to the lens as possible, and this also worked to keep windblown rain off the lens.

As a side-note, our actress (who was of course cold and wet) found that my blanket setup was very warm - a fleece blanket with a space blanket taped to one side. Stayed dry on one side and trapped in maximum warmth.

It all worked like a charm and I was surprised how little issue and how simple it was to protect the camera. I was really concerned about it.

Overall, our shoot went really well. We had a few setbacks and great challenges, given I'd never worked with a rain rig before among other things, but they weren't altogether unexpected. We got some really gorgeous footage and the lighting combined with the rain really sold the mood we wanted. I'm very satisfied as a director.

Again, thank you. If anyone wants to see the fruit of our efforts, please reach out and I'd be happy to share a private link when there's something to see in the next few weeks.

Nick LaRovere
Director
Phoenix, AZ, USA

Founder, STORYTELLER
 
Co-owner, Production Co.
Occulus Films