Topics

Sensor Age

slimgills@...
 

Hi all,

I'm curious if anyone can speak to what happens with today's sensors as they start to get on in hours? Do the remain fairly constant and then begin to fail at some point? How do they fail or degrade? When do certain degradations start to take place? How many hours on a sensor is too many hours?

Specifically, I'm looking at purchasing a Varicam 35 with 3800hrs and wondering where it falls on the curve. Also curious in general.

Would appreciate any links to literature if anyone knows of relevant papers/articles.

Thanks in advance,

Tim Gillis
DP
LA

Gustavo Fattori
 

Hi everyone,

I’m also deeply curious about it.
I’ve shot a tv series last year with an Alexa Plus with +6000h and its ALEV sensor still looks the same by our tests and the DIT reports.
 But how many hours is the last reliable or recommended edge?

Is there any paper/article/stress test made by some professional, or even by Arri-Red-Canon-Sony-etc telling about their hardware?

Thank you,


Gustavo Fattori
camera assistant
São Paulo - Brasil



Em seg, 16 de abr de 2018 às 20:27, <slimgills@...> escreveu:

Hi all,

I'm curious if anyone can speak to what happens with today's sensors as they start to get on in hours? Do the remain fairly constant and then begin to fail at some point? How do they fail or degrade? When do certain degradations start to take place? How many hours on a sensor is too many hours?

Specifically, I'm looking at purchasing a Varicam 35 with 3800hrs and wondering where it falls on the curve. Also curious in general.

Would appreciate any links to literature if anyone knows of relevant papers/articles.

Thanks in advance,

Tim Gillis
DP
LA

--
Gustavo Fattori
+55 11 9 8389 7069
gusfattori@...




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Daniel Rozsnyó
 

There is an ongoing study about aging of industrial / machine vision / sensors:

    http://harvestimaging.com/newproject.php

The sensors can age, mostly due being exposed to UV which may degrade the filters. The power supplies can age - drying capacitors would result in higher amount of noise. And also the thermal solution can degrade by time (not just dust on heat-sink, but also drying of the thermal conductive rubber/paste).

I do not expect anything of this being much noticeable by the end user.


Daniel Rozsnyo
camera developer
Prague, Czech Republic



On 04/17/2018 02:35 AM, Gustavo Fattori wrote:
Hi everyone,

I’m also deeply curious about it.
I’ve shot a tv series last year with an Alexa Plus with +6000h and its ALEV sensor still looks the same by our tests and the DIT reports.
 But how many hours is the last reliable or recommended edge?

Is there any paper/article/stress test made by some professional, or even by Arri-Red-Canon-Sony-etc telling about their hardware?

Thank you,


Gustavo Fattori
camera assistant
São Paulo - Brasil



Em seg, 16 de abr de 2018 às 20:27, <slimgills@...> escreveu:
Hi all,

I'm curious if anyone can speak to what happens with today's sensors as they start to get on in hours? Do the remain fairly constant and then begin to fail at some point? How do they fail or degrade? When do certain degradations start to take place? How many hours on a sensor is too many hours?

Specifically, I'm looking at purchasing a Varicam 35 with 3800hrs and wondering where it falls on the curve. Also curious in general.

Would appreciate any links to literature if anyone knows of relevant papers/articles.

Thanks in advance,

Tim Gillis
DP
LA
--
Gustavo Fattori
+55 11 9 8389 7069
gusfattori@...




- - - - - - - - - - -
WRITING

often it is the only
thing
between you and
impossibility.

no drink,
no woman's love,
no wealth
can
match it. 


Bukowski
- - - - - - - - - - -

Graham Futerfas
 

Not sure if this applies to more modern sensors, but about 10 years ago, I had been told about gamma radiation particles knocking out pixels on the sensor, and the dead pixels can be masked to a certain extent, but eventually this can cause a lot of damage. The radiation is worse when you’re at higher elevations because there’s less atmosphere to protect, but I was told it could be particularly bad for cameras that travelled in airplanes a lot.

Best,
-Graham



---
Graham Futerfas
Director of Photography
Los Angeles, CA
www.GFuterfas.com
---

Toby Birney
 

2 summers ago, I was working for a production company on a traveling documentary series using some old C300’s that were from a big L.A. rental house, so lord only knows how many hours they had clocked by that point. They were workhorses.

We had so many dead pixel problems, that post was pulling out their hair after footage started getting back to them. After a couple of weeks we were black balancing several times a day which did help but did not eliminate the issue.

The following season, the company purchased new C300 mk2’s. No issues, but my anecdotal evidence tells me that time takes a toll on Canon sensors.

Best,
Toby Birney
DOP / Camera Op
currently in Lithuania

Do the remain fairly constant and then begin to fail at some point? How do they fail or degrade?