Topics

Stockings

Jen White
 

Anyone have any particular opinions on using stockings behind the lens? Favorite brands, colors, etc? I finally have a project that I want to use this on and would love your input. Definitely looking for articles about films that used this technique too. I’ve got American Cinematographer back to 1997 so I’ve got that as a resource. Mostly on the prowl for things that aren’t readily available via Google.

Thanks in advance!

Jen



Jen White
ICG 600 DP/LA
jenwhitedop.com

Colin Elves
 

Sounds like they did it in Django unchained: http://www.cinematographer.org/ac_magazine/January2013/DjangoUnchained/page3.php

"When Richardson wanted to soften a shot, he’d ask Tavenner to glue a stocking across the rear element of the lens. This was done mostly for scenes set in the South to reduce overall contrast and add a slight bloom to the highlights. “That reflects the nature of the light down south, which is kind of humid, a little glowing,” Tavenner notes. The stockings varied in their styles and patterns, “but [the effect] mostly depended on how it was stretched and matched to the different focal lengths,” says Tavenner. “Over the years, all these nets have gotten mixed up in my kit, so I just grab a stocking and judge the quality by eye.”

It sounds like something that Mr Richardson does a lot, so probably worth looking through some of his films.

Colin Elves
Director of Photography
Berlin/London



On 8 Apr 2018, at 09:04, Jen White <imajen@...> wrote:

Anyone have any particular opinions on using stockings behind the lens? Favorite brands, colors, etc? I finally have a project that I want to use this on and would love your input. Definitely looking for articles about films that used this technique too. I’ve got American Cinematographer back to 1997 so I’ve got that as a resource. Mostly on the prowl for things that aren’t readily available via Google.

Thanks in advance!

Jen



Jen White
ICG 600 DP/LA
jenwhitedop.com
_._,_._,_

Geoff Boyle
 

Dior 10 denier silk stocking stretched across the back of the lens, usually held in place with nail polish, my lenses, or 3M snot tape, rental lenses.

 

Please note the stockings have to be the ones prior to the US insisting that flame retardant was added to them. This ruined them adding horrible specular highlights.

 

I’ve said many times that the safety aspect was of course of great importance, it was common to see women in Europe bursting into flames as they walked down the street, thankfully now, due to the US regulations, this is a thing of the past.

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Zoetermeer

www.gboyle.co.uk

+31 (0) 637 155 076

 

From: cml-general@... <cml-general@...> On Behalf Of Jen White
Sent: 08 April 2018 10:05
To: cml-general@...
Subject: [general] Stockings

 

Anyone have any particular opinions on using stockings behind the lens? Favorite brands, colors, etc? I finally have a project that I want to use this on and would love your input. Definitely looking for articles about films that used this technique too. I’ve got American Cinematographer back to 1997 so I’ve got that as a resource. Mostly on the prowl for things that aren’t readily available via Google.

._,_._,_

Mark Woods
 

Hi Jen, I used Fogals BTL for many years on my lenses shooting commercials.  Two things to look out for:

1) A stocking BTL has the possibility of being seen with a longer lens
2) A stocking in front of the lens has the possibility of being seen with wider lenses

Beyond that they create a beautiful look.  Think about the weave and the placement in relation to the frame’s horizontal horizon.  The placement of the weave will determine the faint “star” effect’s position.

Enjoy!

Mark

Francis M. Woods
Large Format Fine Art Black & White Still Photographer
Director of Photography
Pasadena, California
http://www.markwoods.com

On Apr 8, 2018, at 1:04 AM, Jen White <imajen@...> wrote:

Anyone have any particular opinions on using stockings behind the lens? Favorite brands, colors, etc? I finally have a project that I want to use this on and would love your input. Definitely looking for articles about films that used this technique too. I’ve got American Cinematographer back to 1997 so I’ve got that as a resource. Mostly on the prowl for things that aren’t readily available via Google.

Thanks in advance!

Jen



Jen White
ICG 600 DP/LA
jenwhitedop.com

Roderick E Stevens II
 

Doesn’t pretty much everything Kaminksi shoots for Spielberg have hose btl? Sometimes they show up rather obnoxiously, particularly when the sun is down the barrel, but otherwise it’s a fun look. I’ve been toying with it myself, but haven’t taken the time to shoot tests, yet.

Roderick
Filmmaker
Arizona

On Apr 8, 2018, at 1:16 AM, Mark Woods via Cml.News <markwoods9=yahoo.com@...> wrote:

Hi Jen, I used Fogals BTL for many years on my lenses shooting commercials.  Two things to look out for:

1) A stocking BTL has the possibility of being seen with a longer lens
2) A stocking in front of the lens has the possibility of being seen with wider lenses

Beyond that they create a beautiful look.  Think about the weave and the placement in relation to the frame’s horizontal horizon.  The placement of the weave will determine the faint “star” effect’s position.

Enjoy!

Mark

Francis M. Woods
Large Format Fine Art Black & White Still Photographer
Director of Photography
Pasadena, California
http://www.markwoods.com

On Apr 8, 2018, at 1:04 AM, Jen White <imajen@...> wrote:

Anyone have any particular opinions on using stockings behind the lens? Favorite brands, colors, etc? I finally have a project that I want to use this on and would love your input. Definitely looking for articles about films that used this technique too. I’ve got American Cinematographer back to 1997 so I’ve got that as a resource. Mostly on the prowl for things that aren’t readily available via Google.

Thanks in advance!

Jen



Jen White
ICG 600 DP/LA
jenwhitedop.com

Art Adams
 

Yeah, I believe Kaminski regularly employs a bleach bypass process in combination with behind-the-lens netting to soften the look a bit.

--
Art Adams
Director of Photography
San Francisco Bay Area

Mike Gluckman
 

There used to be a company that made rings that would allow you to pre-attach the stocking to the ring and then slide on the back of the lens. I found the stockings were always more dense when first mounted and gradually, over a day or two, the fibers stretched and it became less dense. If you can attach your stocking a couple of days before filming, the amount of diffusion will be more consistent.


Mike Gluckman
dp | Orlando

Mako Koiwai
 

We did a few 100 lenses like this:


Makofoto, S. Pasadena, Ca

Art Adams
 

That was Jim Iacona's I-Rings, which he made primarily for B4 lenses. Jim is still around but I don't think he makes I-Rings anymore. They were a great product.

--
Art Adams
Director of Photography
San Francisco Bay Area

Tom Barkstedt
 

Good old fashioned snot tape works great without any fancy rings. Never had any change in density when done properly but always had my 1st check before mounting on camera...                  
--
Tom
Tom Barkstedt
StoryArts Films, LLC
Asheville, NC
828-301-1137

David Moravec
 

Not sure how this email thread started but I used rear nets quite often when shooting film and even HD 3 chip video cameras. 
When I try them using single sensor digital (1080 or 4K) I find the effect is too strong even with very sheer nets. 
A shame because I do miss it. 
Anyone having success with the new digital cameras?

Thanks

David Moravec 
DoP Chicago 
Kinzie Street Studios

On Apr 8, 2018, at 12:47 PM, Tom Barkstedt <tombarkstedt@...> wrote:

Good old fashioned snot tape works great without any fancy rings. Never had any change in density when done properly but always had my 1st check before mounting on camera...                  
--
Tom
Tom Barkstedt
StoryArts Films, LLC
Asheville, NC
828-301-1137

Mako Koiwai
 

It’s not about being Sheer, it’s about being open weave, and then controlling how much stretch you use. The Fogal black silk 110 was THE stocking to use, because of it’s Open and ASYMMETRICAL weave. Alas, no more. Folks are finding a few left over packs at their Paris store and perhaps Macy’s NYC. Sounds like Fogal folded?

Makofoto, ex-buyer of Extra Large stockings :-)

Jen White
 

Thanks everyone- all of this information is really helpful.

Jen White
ICG 600 DP/LA
jenwhitedop.com

Bob Kertesz
 

There used to be a company that made rings that would allow you to
pre-attach the stocking to the ring and then slide on the back of the
lens. I found the stockings were always more dense when first mounted
and gradually, over a day or two, the fibers stretched and it became
less dense. If you can attach your stocking a couple of days before
filming, the amount of diffusion will be more consistent.
Lack of consistency would be the downside, especially over days of
shooting or putting the things on multiple cameras/lenses. The amount of
diffusion is directly related to how tightly the stocking is stretched,
and its own tendency to 'relax' over hours or days of use, temperature
variations, and so on.

I've seen good looking stuff using them, and some real horror shows when
multiple cameras didn't come close to matching in diffusion levels, or
single cameras were all over the place over days of shooting with or
without different lenses.

Be cautious.

-Bob

Bob Kertesz
BlueScreen LLC
Hollywood, California

DIT, Video Controller, and live compositor extraordinaire.

High quality images for more than four decades - whether you've wanted
them or not.©

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George Hupka
 

Schneider had their new True-Net filters at NAB this week.  Front-of-lens filter, so obviously it will be a different effect, but it does produce a lovely bloom on highlights and there should be a lot less problem with consistency.
 
Worth a test, although I'm sure the effect will be different from behind-the-lens stockings...
--

----------
George Hupka
Director/DP
Saskatoon, Canada
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