Topics

Canon Lens questions

Barbara Holler
 

Canon 300mm t2.8 century optics 2000 PL Mount
Does anyone know much about this lens? I am finding it difficult to get information on it. Thank you

This got through, unsigned messages normally bounce

Mako Koiwai
 

What is there to know? It's one of the earlier Fluorite element Canon still lenses, adapted to PL. Quite decent. Fluorite greatly reduces color fringing that was the big limiting factor in telephoto resolution.

Makofoto, S. Pasadena, ca

Miguel Bunster
 

Hi,
If not mistaken is a lens design for full frame so on most PL cameras it will have a crop factor.

Miguel Bunster
DP Chile

On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 2:43 AM, Mako Koiwai <mako1foto@...> wrote:
What is there to know? It's one of the earlier Fluorite element Canon still lenses, adapted to PL. Quite decent. Fluorite greatly reduces color fringing that was the big limiting factor in telephoto resolution.



--
Miguel Bunster
www.miguelbunster.com
LA - (323) 963-4397
Chile - 7.9652894

Libre de virus. www.avast.com

karlkimdp@...
 

Crop factor???
A 300mm is a 300mm regardless of ff or s35 camera. Some lenses have different image circles depending on their design, but to say a 300mm designed for ff still cameras will have a “crop factor” on a s35 camera is not accurate. 

The inverse may be true.  A 300mm designed for a small format camera (say 16mm or 8mm) may certainly have a “crop factor” when used on a large format camera. You may have to “crop” or enlarge the image with some lenses  if you don’t want a heavy vignette. 

But to answer the OP, i’ve owned several 300mm Canon L FD lenses converted to PL over the years. Very pleasing to me.  We described them as “creamy/pretty” as opposed to “clinical/ hyper sharp.” Also easy to focus when equipped w focus gear. 




On Mar 10, 2018, at 9:25 AM, Miguel Bunster <miguel.bunster@...> wrote:

Hi,
If not mistaken is a lens design for full frame so on most PL cameras it will have a crop factor.

Miguel Bunster
DP Chile

On Sat, Mar 10, 2018 at 2:43 AM, Mako Koiwai <mako1foto@...> wrote:
What is there to know? It's one of the earlier Fluorite element Canon still lenses, adapted to PL. Quite decent. Fluorite greatly reduces color fringing that was the big limiting factor in telephoto resolution.



--
Miguel Bunster
www.miguelbunster.com
LA - (323) 963-4397
Chile - 7.9652894

Libre de virus. www.avast.com

Mitch Gross
 

On Mar 10, 2018, at 9:25 AM, Miguel Bunster <miguel.bunster@...> wrote:

Hi,
If not mistaken is a lens design for full frame so on most PL cameras it will have a crop factor.

Miguel Bunster
DP Chile

I guess this is still a question. A lens does not have a crop factor. A lens just projects an image and it has no idea what is behind it. It can be designed to project an image large enough to cover a certain sized target, but that has no connection to the focal length. Focal length describes the magnification, no matter the size of the projected area. 

A 300mm will always project a certain magnification. How much of that image you use is determined by what size sensor you place behind the lens. The difference between these sensor sizes is the relative crop factor, but that has nothing to do with the lens and everything to do with the sensors. 

And lastly, eight years & going strong:



Mitch Gross
Cinema Product Manager 
Panasonic Media Entertainment Company
New York


John Tarver
 

Thanks Mitch.

This whole “crop factor” thing still driving us nuts.  I show your great video to kids in my cinematography class since I ...  just ... can’t .....

Cheers!

John Tarver, csc
Director of Photography

On Mar 10, 2018, at 12:16 PM, Mitch Gross <mitchgrosscml@...> wrote:

On Mar 10, 2018, at 9:25 AM, Miguel Bunster <miguel.bunster@...> wrote:

Hi,
If not mistaken is a lens design for full frame so on most PL cameras it will have a crop factor.

Miguel Bunster
DP Chile

I guess this is still a question. A lens does not have a crop factor. A lens just projects an image and it has no idea what is behind it. It can be designed to project an image large enough to cover a certain sized target, but that has no connection to the focal length. Focal length describes the magnification, no matter the size of the projected area. 

A 300mm will always project a certain magnification. How much of that image you use is determined by what size sensor you place behind the lens. The difference between these sensor sizes is the relative crop factor, but that has nothing to do with the lens and everything to do with the sensors. 

And lastly, eight years & going strong:



Mitch Gross
Cinema Product Manager 
Panasonic Media Entertainment Company
New York


Miguel Bunster
 



Yes! I stand corrected, total miss explanation on my part, or lassy writing...which ever was wrong.
thanks!

Miguel


I guess this is still a question. A lens does not have a crop factor. A lens just projects an image and it has no idea what is behind it. It can be designed to project an image large enough to cover a certain sized target, but that has no connection to the focal length. Focal length describes the magnification, no matter the size of the projected area. 

A 300mm will always project a certain magnification. How much of that image you use is determined by what size sensor you place behind the lens. The difference between these sensor sizes is the relative crop factor, but that has nothing to do with the lens and everything to do with the sensors. 

And lastly, eight years & going strong:



Mitch Gross
Cinema Product Manager 
Panasonic Media Entertainment Company
New York





--
Miguel Bunster
www.miguelbunster.com
LA - (323) 963-4397
Chile - 7.9652894

Libre de virus. www.avast.com