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Sigma 50-100 1.8 interviews/breathing? (was: Stills lenses what's missing?)

Jim Feeley
 

So Steve and everyone, I've seen examples of the heavy breathing the Sigma 50-100 1.8 exhibits during big racks. But are you finding for talking heads that the breathing isn't noticeable or at least not distracting? And just so I have a rough sense of what's going on, sounds like you're rolling pretty wide open, aperture wise, right?

Thanks,

jim feeley
pov media
word image sound
near san francisco usa

On May 1, 2018, at 8:41 AM, Steve Oakley <steveo@...> wrote:

sigma 50-100 1.8 as a talking heads lens. I opted to NOT go with the cinema version because of the lack of AF. when shooting that typical elbows up or closer framing, the AF if managed correctly will keep the face always sharp even when the subject / talent moves around and your DoF is maybe 1-2”. makes life so much better. 

Steve Oakley
 

Hi Jim 

the breathing can be noticeable under some circumstances more than others. the one its probably most noticeable is if the AF lags and then snaps into focus.  turning down the AF rate helps. I experienced that yesterday shooting a short walk and talk of a distance of a couple of feet, basically wide open-2.0 1/2 @ 65mm or so.  the face tracking lost its target because talent turned off camera, then back. I was in continuous AF.  thankfully the guy only turned away right before takes so only one take was a tosser because of some AF over reaction.

 sure an AC would of been nice but I got stuck working by myself to grab these shots because it was all last minute and covering for another DP who couldn’t make it. I’m also between follow focuses ( sold old one, waiting for new one to someday show up ).  I was also dealing with other stuff so I had to rely on the AF which worked decently enough. Better than trying to do it by hand while fending off producer who was, shall we say a little too hands on towards the camera.

bottom line is the lens can truely look amazing so you may decide to pick your poison wisely. it would be great if the lens didn’t breath so much, but OTH it has enough other things going for it that, well, you just learn to work with it as much as you can. 

S

On May 3, 2018, at 10:51 PM, Jim Feeley <jfeeley@...> wrote:

So Steve and everyone, I've seen examples of the heavy breathing the Sigma 50-100 1.8 exhibits during big racks. But are you finding for talking heads that the breathing isn't noticeable or at least not distracting? And just so I have a rough sense of what's going on, sounds like you're rolling pretty wide open, aperture wise, right?

Thanks,

jim feeley
pov media
word image sound
near san francisco usa

On May 1, 2018, at 8:41 AM, Steve Oakley <steveo@...> wrote:

sigma 50-100 1.8 as a talking heads lens. I opted to NOT go with the cinema version because of the lack of AF. when shooting that typical elbows up or closer framing, the AF if managed correctly will keep the face always sharp even when the subject / talent moves around and your DoF is maybe 1-2”. makes life so much better. 
_._,_._,_

Ben Rowland, Yonder Blue Films
 

I own a 50-100 Sigma. It does breathe for sure, BUT in use, it hasn’t been an issue. The only situation where it would call attention to itself is a huge focus shift on a static shot. I haven’t run into that (I’m sure one day I could). The camera is either moving (which covers up the breathing) or focus changes are too minimal for the breathing to be noticeable. I was hesitant before purchasing, but now I love it. It’s a great deal on a FAST short zoom. 

Lenses that it competes with are either slower or more expensive. Each have their pros and cons, but the Sigma overall is a winner. 

Happy filming,
Benjamin Rowland 
Traveling currently for a doc, Director 
--
Ben Rowland

Geoff Boyle
 

Which camera?

 

If a Canon then you can select a shape track and then a face within that and that will pretty much cover you for these kind of face turns

 

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Netherlands

www.gboyle.co.uk

 

 

 

From: cml-glass@... <cml-glass@...> On Behalf Of Steve Oakley

the breathing can be noticeable under some circumstances more than others. the one its probably most noticeable is if the AF lags and then snaps into focus.  turning down the AF rate helps. I experienced that yesterday shooting a short walk and talk of a distance of a couple of feet, basically wide open-2.0 1/2 @ 65mm or so.  the face tracking lost its target because talent turned off camera, then back. I was in continuous AF.  thankfully the guy only turned away right before takes so only one take was a tosser because of some AF over reaction.

 

Karl Kim
 

With the C300M2 you can also set AF to "Face Only" instead of "face priority" which helps to reduce the camera from hunting for focus if it loses the face.

I have the Sigma 50-100 and the autofocus performance in video is noticeably different from say, Canon's Cn-E 18-80 AF zoom lens.  The Sigma hunts more, the AF takes longer to lock, and when it does- it is abrupt, even when turning the AF speed down to -7.  I have not tested the AF capability of the Sigma much- usually I turn AF off and manual focus.  The focus throw is about 160 degrees (completely seat of pants- less than 180, more than 135 degrees).  For bread and butter interviews it's an easy lens to work with.

As others have said, the 50-100 breathes a ton- as do many other still lenses on a big pull.  At the camera store I was able to put on a number of Sigma Art primes, Canon L primes and a few older Zeiss ZE primes- they all breath to varying degrees, as everyone here knows.  The Canon 18-80 CN-E zoom had surprising minimal breathing- especially when a-b'ing with the still glass. (oddly the owner of the store, a photographer, couldn't readily see the breathing)  The T4.4 on the Canon zoom is a problem, as that look is simply not what many clients are looking for.

On Sun, May 6, 2018 at 7:58 AM, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

Which camera?

 

If a Canon then you can select a shape track and then a face within that and that will pretty much cover you for these kind of face turns

 

 

Cheers

 

Geoff Boyle NSC FBKS

Cinematographer

Netherlands

www.gboyle.co.uk

 

 

 

From: cml-glass@... <cml-glass@...> On Behalf Of Steve Oakley

the breathing can be noticeable under some circumstances more than others. the one its probably most noticeable is if the AF lags and then snaps into focus.  turning down the AF rate helps. I experienced that yesterday shooting a short walk and talk of a distance of a couple of feet, basically wide open-2.0 1/2 @ 65mm or so.  the face tracking lost its target because talent turned off camera, then back. I was in continuous AF.  thankfully the guy only turned away right before takes so only one take was a tosser because of some AF over reaction.

 




--
Karl Kim

alfonso parra
 

You can see the test we performed on the sigma zoom where we studied breathing itself, which is very noticeable, at IMAGO website.
http://www.imago.org/index.php/technical/item/675-the-sigma-zoom-lenses-test-review.html

Best regards
Alfonso Parra AEC, ADFC
www.alfonsoparra.com
Tel Colombia 57 3115798776
Tel Spain 34 639 109 309

Feli di Giorgio
 




On May 6, 2018, at 8:09 AM, alfonso parra <info@...> wrote:

You can see the test we performed on the sigma zoom where we studied breathing itself, which is very noticeable, at IMAGO website.
http://www.imago.org/index.php/technical/item/675-the-sigma-zoom-lenses-test-review.html


Very nice test. Thanks for posting this.

Feli di Giorgio
VFX / Bay Area

_______________________________________________
Feli di Giorgio - feli2@... - www.felidigiorgio.com