Topics

storm fx

Rob Wilton
 

Thanks everyone for your thoughts and contributions!

We were shooting in Bangkok and my gaffer couldn't find any 1500w paparazzi's.
But he did managed to do some tests for me on really short notice. We had to shoot on the Alexa Mini and tested a few different lights - Skypanels, HMI shutters, Atomic 3000's and Hungaroflash Quasar 15kw's.

Atomic's gave use shutter issues, especially at higher framerates. HMI shutters felt too slow for our liking.
Ended up with the Skypanels. We used the Hungaroflash for the wide shots and the Skypanels for closer shots. The skypanels gave us no shutter issues whatsoever. The Hungaroflash Quasar only on rare occasion.

Thank you again for this great resource.

best

Rob Wilton DoP





On 12 January 2018 at 19:09, Tom Guiney <tomguiney.cml@...> wrote:
Dataflashes are another good cheapie for this, I thik they care called AF1000s?   Get them from theatrical rental houses for cheap.  Paparazzis are better, i find, but dataflashers are cheaper. Theyre along the same lines as the Atomic 3000s that Alan mentioned. You can actually buy used ones for a few hundred bucks.

Tom Guiney
dpgafferproducersoftboxer
Bay Area

On Thu, Dec 21, 2017 at 2:49 PM, Robert Ruffo via Groups.Io <robert_ruffo=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I would also make sure to use a camera with an global shutter, such as the Sony F55 (if I recall correctly, the F5 does not have a global shutter, only the F55) or even the F35 which holds up surprisingly well in 2017 if given enough light and fed to a good external recorder,  Anything with a rolling shutter (almost all other cameras, including all Arris) will look awful with strobe-hit type effects unless you slow them down to an expressionist crawl.  They will just make ugly stripes of brightness. 
 
Robert Ruffo
Amber+Robert Media
323.201.2709
Beauty will save the world.
                                     (Dostoyevsky)



From: AJ <arthurjacobsen@...>
To: cml-lighting@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2017 1:06 PM
Subject: Re: [cml-lighting] storm fx

For lightning effect, consider the Atomic 3000 units. Very cheap from rock-and-roll lighting rental companies, so easy to get bunch of them to play off of each other. I agree that key to a realistic lighting effect is to have multiple units to create moving shadows.

The atomic 3000s are so cheap and simple (no DMX needed if used with the “detonator” controller) that you could ring the car with them and create multiple moving lightning flashes from different directions.

Note they are not bright enough for daylight use, but in low light level nighttime or studio situation they do great.

Hope this helps,
Alan Jacobsen
DP - NYC



--
Alan Jacobsen - Director of Photography
www.alanjax.com
141 Palisade Street, Suite 241 | M: 917.749.8376
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 | F: 775-490-2157

STRONG ISLAND wins the Gotham for Best Doc of the Year!!!
http://filmmakermagazine.com/103936-call-me-by-your-name-get-out-top-2017-ifp-gotham-awards/

“Relentless" -Screen
“Extraordinary” -TheGuardian
“Unflinching” -Village Voice
“Remarkable” -IndeWire
“Transfixing” -BFI
“Wrenching” -The New Yorker
--






--

-----------------------

Rob Wilton | Cinematographer | London

Tom Guiney
 

Dataflashes are another good cheapie for this, I thik they care called AF1000s?   Get them from theatrical rental houses for cheap.  Paparazzis are better, i find, but dataflashers are cheaper. Theyre along the same lines as the Atomic 3000s that Alan mentioned. You can actually buy used ones for a few hundred bucks.

Tom Guiney
dpgafferproducersoftboxer
Bay Area

On Thu, Dec 21, 2017 at 2:49 PM, Robert Ruffo via Groups.Io <robert_ruffo@...> wrote:
I would also make sure to use a camera with an global shutter, such as the Sony F55 (if I recall correctly, the F5 does not have a global shutter, only the F55) or even the F35 which holds up surprisingly well in 2017 if given enough light and fed to a good external recorder,  Anything with a rolling shutter (almost all other cameras, including all Arris) will look awful with strobe-hit type effects unless you slow them down to an expressionist crawl.  They will just make ugly stripes of brightness. 
 
Robert Ruffo
Amber+Robert Media
323.201.2709
Beauty will save the world.
                                     (Dostoyevsky)



From: AJ <arthurjacobsen@...>
To: cml-lighting@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2017 1:06 PM
Subject: Re: [cml-lighting] storm fx

For lightning effect, consider the Atomic 3000 units. Very cheap from rock-and-roll lighting rental companies, so easy to get bunch of them to play off of each other. I agree that key to a realistic lighting effect is to have multiple units to create moving shadows.

The atomic 3000s are so cheap and simple (no DMX needed if used with the “detonator” controller) that you could ring the car with them and create multiple moving lightning flashes from different directions.

Note they are not bright enough for daylight use, but in low light level nighttime or studio situation they do great.

Hope this helps,
Alan Jacobsen
DP - NYC



--
Alan Jacobsen - Director of Photography
www.alanjax.com
141 Palisade Street, Suite 241 | M: 917.749.8376
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 | F: 775-490-2157

STRONG ISLAND wins the Gotham for Best Doc of the Year!!!
http://filmmakermagazine.com/103936-call-me-by-your-name-get-out-top-2017-ifp-gotham-awards/

“Relentless" -Screen
“Extraordinary” -TheGuardian
“Unflinching” -Village Voice
“Remarkable” -IndeWire
“Transfixing” -BFI
“Wrenching” -The New Yorker
--


Robert Ruffo
 

I would also make sure to use a camera with an global shutter, such as the Sony F55 (if I recall correctly, the F5 does not have a global shutter, only the F55) or even the F35 which holds up surprisingly well in 2017 if given enough light and fed to a good external recorder,  Anything with a rolling shutter (almost all other cameras, including all Arris) will look awful with strobe-hit type effects unless you slow them down to an expressionist crawl.  They will just make ugly stripes of brightness. 
 
Robert Ruffo
Amber+Robert Media
www.AmberandRobertMedia.com
514.448.1526
323.201.2709
Beauty will save the world.
                                     (Dostoyevsky)



From: AJ <arthurjacobsen@...>
To: cml-lighting@groups.io
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2017 1:06 PM
Subject: Re: [cml-lighting] storm fx

For lightning effect, consider the Atomic 3000 units. Very cheap from rock-and-roll lighting rental companies, so easy to get bunch of them to play off of each other. I agree that key to a realistic lighting effect is to have multiple units to create moving shadows.

The atomic 3000s are so cheap and simple (no DMX needed if used with the “detonator” controller) that you could ring the car with them and create multiple moving lightning flashes from different directions.

Note they are not bright enough for daylight use, but in low light level nighttime or studio situation they do great.

Hope this helps,
Alan Jacobsen
DP - NYC



--
Alan Jacobsen - Director of Photography
www.alanjax.com
141 Palisade Street, Suite 241 | M: 917.749.8376
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 | F: 775-490-2157

STRONG ISLAND wins the Gotham for Best Doc of the Year!!!
http://filmmakermagazine.com/103936-call-me-by-your-name-get-out-top-2017-ifp-gotham-awards/

“Relentless" -Screen
“Extraordinary” -TheGuardian
“Unflinching” -Village Voice
“Remarkable” -IndeWire
“Transfixing” -BFI
“Wrenching” -The New Yorker
--


AJ
 

For lightning effect, consider the Atomic 3000 units. Very cheap from rock-and-roll lighting rental companies, so easy to get bunch of them to play off of each other. I agree that key to a realistic lighting effect is to have multiple units to create moving shadows.

The atomic 3000s are so cheap and simple (no DMX needed if used with the “detonator” controller) that you could ring the car with them and create multiple moving lightning flashes from different directions.

Note they are not bright enough for daylight use, but in low light level nighttime or studio situation they do great.

Hope this helps,
Alan Jacobsen
DP - NYC



--
Alan Jacobsen - Director of Photography
www.alanjax.com
141 Palisade Street, Suite 241 | M: 917.749.8376
Dobbs Ferry, NY 10522 | F: 775-490-2157

STRONG ISLAND wins the Gotham for Best Doc of the Year!!!
http://filmmakermagazine.com/103936-call-me-by-your-name-get-out-top-2017-ifp-gotham-awards/

“Relentless" -Screen
“Extraordinary” -TheGuardian
“Unflinching” -Village Voice
“Remarkable” -IndeWire
“Transfixing” -BFI
“Wrenching” -The New Yorker
--

 

for lightning.....photography camera flashes before...ultra low budget solution! use two...fire them off milliseconds apart if possible

sid firstframe.com
 

hey bruce don't forget..
cut stencil in box "hotel" - light from within box with colored gel. suspend box on c stand with arm and swing it across top of windshield to reveal "hotel" reflection in glass. ahh seat of your pants production in Maine. miss it. 

- Sid

SID LEVIN | Principal | DP | Editor
FirstFrame Inc - 978.501.0488


On Dec 21, 2017, at 10:34 AM, Brucelundeen@... via Groups.Io <brucelundeen@...> wrote:

Hi all you probably know this but Classic Rockport International Film Workshops car set-up:
Hose for rain, 2by4 out trunk for grips to bounce car, two lights 4 ft apart on 2x4 (each side) with grips running by car, dousing, going back to front and repeating, shine a red light through windshield for stop, change to green
Fun!!!

Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 20, 2017, at 5:34 PM, Rob Wilton <rob.wilton@...> wrote:



Dear all,

I have a question about mimicking the elements.

I'm shooting inside a car, in a studio. I've been asked to create a night time storm effect outside the car, and make it seem like the car is moving.

I'm thinking wind machines and water on the windows for starters. Does anyone have any good tips they would recommend for simulating lightning effects?

On a sort of side note - what's the reason of using a polarizer filter during rain fx? I read Matthew Libatique did this for Noah.

thank you for your time

best

Rob Wilton
DoP
London based



 

-----------------------

Rob Wilton | Cinematographer | London

Brucelundeen@yahoo.com
 

Hi all you probably know this but Classic Rockport International Film Workshops car set-up:
Hose for rain, 2by4 out trunk for grips to bounce car, two lights 4 ft apart on 2x4 (each side) with grips running by car, dousing, going back to front and repeating, shine a red light through windshield for stop, change to green
Fun!!!

Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 20, 2017, at 5:34 PM, Rob Wilton <rob.wilton@...> wrote:



Dear all,

I have a question about mimicking the elements.

I'm shooting inside a car, in a studio. I've been asked to create a night time storm effect outside the car, and make it seem like the car is moving.

I'm thinking wind machines and water on the windows for starters. Does anyone have any good tips they would recommend for simulating lightning effects?

On a sort of side note - what's the reason of using a polarizer filter during rain fx? I read Matthew Libatique did this for Noah.

thank you for your time

best

Rob Wilton
DoP
London based



 

-----------------------

Rob Wilton | Cinematographer | London

David Pringle
 

“Anyone renting those 1500W Paparazzis in Toronto?”

 

William F. White will have them across Canada in late January.

 

David Pringle, owner-founder of Lightning Strikes and SoftSun

N. Hollywood, CA, USA

 



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John Tarver
 

Hi David,
Anyone renting those 1500W Paparazzis in Toronto?

Cheers,

John Tarver, csc
DP - In TO

George Hupka
 

David,

That's very cool - I haven't heard of the 1500W Paparazzi, I've seen the 8K but the smaller one is very interesting.
--
----------
George Hupka
Director/DP
Saskatoon, Canada
Listmum, Cinematography Mailing List

Suresh ROHIN
 

Cream Source has a phase control so that you bring down the striking time also since you vary the timing at burst output on that Fixture you get excellent effect.  Also you can sync it to your Camera shutter angle.  So no way you miss that burst real effect.

Reason for the Polarizer is to make the rain drops more pronounced and avoid reflections out of it as well.  Also if it is day exterior it acts as a ND Filter as well.. I had achieved excellent effects when I was shooting in 35 mm.  I needed to pump up the lighting level in side the Car too.  

Suresh ROHIN
Eastmanfilms.
www.sureshrohin.com
www.eastmanfilms.net
+14168985323. (USA & CANADA,)

On Dec 20, 2017 8:05 PM, "Rob Wilton" <rob.wilton@...> wrote:


Dear all,

I have a question about mimicking the elements.

I'm shooting inside a car, in a studio. I've been asked to create a night time storm effect outside the car, and make it seem like the car is moving.

I'm thinking wind machines and water on the windows for starters. Does anyone have any good tips they would recommend for simulating lightning effects?

On a sort of side note - what's the reason of using a polarizer filter during rain fx? I read Matthew Libatique did this for Noah.

thank you for your time

best

Rob Wilton
DoP
London based



 

-----------------------

Rob Wilton | Cinematographer | London

David Pringle
 

If you aren't going the traditional Lightning Strikes route,”

 

Yes there other ways to flash lights, but there are limitations with LED and with HMI shutters.

Mainly the relatively slow response time.  Normally the timing of a lightning flash is critical to get the most effect from the flash.  Traditional Lightning Strikes have extremely fast and accurate response time in that they can go from off to full on-to off again all in one millisecond.  A traditional LED can take as much as a half second to reach full power.  An LED specially configured for instant response can respond in less than 1/48th of a second, but this type of LED is not very common. 

 

Lightning Strikes has recently developed a 1500 watt LED package that responds in less than 1/100th of a second, and follows a random dimming pattern similar to traditional Lightning Strikes.  Although it is 1,500 watts, the source is very small so that you get a hard shadow with it.  Speaking of shadows, lightning flashes are much more dramatic if you alternate back and forth between two sources so that the shadows and highlights jump back and forth.  Again this requires fast response times.

 

Rob- these new 1500 watt LED Paparazzi lights are now available from CirroLite in London.

 

With a vested interest – David Pringle, owner and founder of Lightning Strikes and SoftSun

North Hollywood, CA, USA

 



Office Hours
Monday - Friday
8:00 - 18:00

Let's consider our environmental responsibility before printing this e-mail - Save paper.

This message contains confidential information and is intended only for the individual named. If you are not the named addressee you should not disseminate, distribute or copy this e-mail. Please notify the sender immediately by e-mail if you have received this e-mail by mistake and delete this e-mail from your system. E-mail transmission cannot be guaranteed to be secure or error-free as information could be intercepted, corrupted, lost, destroyed, arrive late or incomplete, or contain viruses. The sender therefore does not accept liability for any errors or omissions in the contents of this message, which arise as a result of e-mail transmission. Luminys System Corp.,11961 Sherman Rd.,North Hollywood,CA 91605, www.luminyscorp.com

Stuart Brereton
 

On Dec 20, 2017, at 2:34 PM, Rob Wilton <rob.wilton@...> wrote:
Does anyone have any good tips they would recommend for simulating lightning effects?
I usually use dimmer shutters on HMIs. It’s a cheaper solution than getting a specialist lamp in, and there are no rolling shutter issues.

Stuart Brereton
DP, LA

George Hupka
 

If you aren't going the traditional Lightning Strikes route, there are a lot of LED systems that have pretty decent strobe/lightning effects.  I just picked up a couple of Creamsource Micros to travel with for documentary shoots, and discovered to my surprise that even they have built in strobe and lightning effects.  There are a lot more choices out there than there used to be a few years ago...particularly if you're working in small spaces and don't need the big guns.

--
----------
George Hupka
Director/DP
Saskatoon, Canada
Listmum, Cinematography Mailing List

Rob Wilton
 



Dear all,

I have a question about mimicking the elements.

I'm shooting inside a car, in a studio. I've been asked to create a night time storm effect outside the car, and make it seem like the car is moving.

I'm thinking wind machines and water on the windows for starters. Does anyone have any good tips they would recommend for simulating lightning effects?

On a sort of side note - what's the reason of using a polarizer filter during rain fx? I read Matthew Libatique did this for Noah.

thank you for your time

best

Rob Wilton
DoP
London based



 

-----------------------

Rob Wilton | Cinematographer | London