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Colored fog + rear projection, thoughts?

Sean Emer
 

Hi guys, I'm shooting a music video this month. The main reference from the director is to Sia's 'Rainbow' music video in terms of style, but a different color pallet. I've done rear projection before, and smoke effects, but I've never had to blend the two. Anyone have tips or experience for how to properly light clouds of fog on a stage without making it seem 'shafty' and drawing attention to the rear projection? My initial inclination is to make a soft wide backlight with a row of S60s, and have some RGBA units on the ground to move around for other color hits, but I'm not positive it'll work. What you all think?

Sean Emer
DP - LA

 

Denis Villeneuve was interviewed on BBC Radio 5 Lives “Hello to Jason Isaacs” film show about the released of BR2049 on DVD.  

When asked what it was Roger Deakins bought to the party, he mentioned the scene in the film that was similar to what you describe (I haven’t seen it yet) where they filled a massive soundstage with fog.

You could do worse than ask on Deakins own forum: https://www.rogerdeakins.com/forums/


Michael J Sanders
Director of Photography/Cinematographer  

reel & credits @ www.mjsanders.co.uk   

mobile:   07976 269818   
diary:      020 8426 2200



On 30 Jan 2018, at 21:43, seanemer@... wrote:

before, and smoke effects, but I've never had to blend the two. Anyone have tips or experience for how to properly light clouds of fog on a stage without making it seem 'shafty' and drawing attention to the rear projection? My initial inclination is to make a soft wide backlight with a row of S60s, and have some RGBA units on the ground to move around for other color hits, but I'm not positive it'll work. What you all think?

Sean Emer
 

Thanks for the tip Michael! I did make a post over there, as well as on cinematography.com but so far no bites! Must be a pretty damn niche application haha

emily.stadulis@...
 

Hi, Sean, it may be that you really need a haze effect more than fog.  Fog tends to be "wispy" and "shafty" as it's really meant more for a smoke effect like a cigarette burning, steam from a manhole cover, fire/smoke from an explosion, etc. so the particles are bigger, 'fall' more quickly, and don't blend as much.  Haze machines creates a much lighter, finer, atmosphere that blends, hangs longer and works better to just catch rays of light (rather than being able to see the smoke effect itself) and create a general...well...haze....rather than an effect.  So it may be that simply using a haze machine over a fog machine goes a long way towards obscuring the rear projection effects you're after.  Here are some of our blog posts that show and describe the different effects:

Haze vs. Fog on Disney's "Into the Woods": http://www.rosco.com/spectrum/index.php/2015/02/take-your-stage-into-the-woods/
Technqiues for creating haze with fog machines, including camera tests:  http://www.rosco.com/spectrum/index.php/2013/06/let-your-camera-see-the-light/
Subtle ways to adjust fog/haze effects for the camera:  http://www.rosco.com/spectrum/index.php/2016/09/5-tips-on-using-fog-haze-in-your-photography/

I'm local to LA and I'd by happy to meet at your showroom if you want to get together to test some different machines and fluids in conjunction with our LED fixtures (we have both RGBW and RGBA fixtures as well as rear projection screen and gobo rotators/effects if you want to play with different options, camera angles, etc.  

Hope this helps and good luck with the rest of the project, Sean! 

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Emily Stadulis
Western Rep
Rosco Laboratories
323-241-2615
emily.stadulis@...