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Looking for Sun Gun Light

Crystal
 

Hello,

Does anyone recall a light that maybe called a "Sun Gun". I am looking for a small unit battery operated unit with a strong narrow beam. I have seen other cinematographers in the ASC magazine use it especially when they are mount to solider's guns. They produce a great pin point light.  

Please let me know if anyone as knowledge of where I can rent or buy this light. Thank you

If you don't sign your message  it will bounce in future

Thomas Townend
 


On 26 Oct 2018, at 07:19, Crystal <crystalk9@...> wrote:

I am looking for a small unit battery operated unit with a strong narrow beam. I have seen other cinematographers in the ASC magazine use it especially when they are mount to solider's guns. They produce a great pin point light

Do you want them for actually mounting on guns?  If so there’s a clip/bracket involved that’s often particular to that gauge/brand of gun. 

The generic term is ‘tactical flashlight’. All LED & battery based these days. A ‘Sun Gun’ - also a generic term - was always a much, much larger device that comprised of a 12/24v battery with a carrying strap (usually about the same heft as a car battery) and a cable running to either a quartz halogen or HMI bulb housed in a small reflector with a pistol grip handle. They rarely focused to a particularly narrow beam. It was more akin to a hand held ‘redhead’. 

Have a look here (the first thing that came up when I googled ‘tactical flashlight’) and you’ll see the sort of range of spec’ and prices involved - https://gearmoose.com/best-tactical-flashlights/

And remember, if you want nicely defined narrow beams of light on set you’ll need atmospheric haze. 

Tom Townend,
Cinematographer/London

Jeff Kreines
 

The Sun Guns were made by Sylvania in the 60s and early 70s. Open-faced quartz lights — some AC and some with a battery pack — either 30v or the 12v “amateur” version. Usually mounted to the camera for really hideous lighting. 

Not what you want!  The name makes me cringe. 


image1.jpeg



Jeff Kreines

Sent from iPhone. 

On Oct 26, 2018, at 5:58 AM, Thomas Townend via Cml.News <tomtownend=yahoo.co.uk@...> wrote:


On 26 Oct 2018, at 07:19, Crystal <crystalk9@...> wrote:

I am looking for a small unit battery operated unit with a strong narrow beam. I have seen other cinematographers in the ASC magazine use it especially when they are mount to solider's guns. They produce a great pin point light

Do you want them for actually mounting on guns?  If so there’s a clip/bracket involved that’s often particular to that gauge/brand of gun. 

The generic term is ‘tactical flashlight’. All LED & battery based these days. A ‘Sun Gun’ - also a generic term - was always a much, much larger device that comprised of a 12/24v battery with a carrying strap (usually about the same heft as a car battery) and a cable running to either a quartz halogen or HMI bulb housed in a small reflector with a pistol grip handle. They rarely focused to a particularly narrow beam. It was more akin to a hand held ‘redhead’. 

Have a look here (the first thing that came up when I googled ‘tactical flashlight’) and you’ll see the sort of range of spec’ and prices involved - https://gearmoose.com/best-tactical-flashlights/

And remember, if you want nicely defined narrow beams of light on set you’ll need atmospheric haze. 

Tom Townend,
Cinematographer/London

James Barber
 

From what I remember SunGuns tended to be hand-held HMIs (haven't really seen them since the early 2000's though) connected to a big shoulder-slung battery pack. Had more of a 30º beam than super narrow (thought I guess you can lens any light). I THINK there was a brand called SunGun but not 100% on that one.

For guns, I'd literally look at a company that makes lights for them, like Surefire. I have a small halogen Surefire flashlight and the beam, while not super narrow, is beautifully lacking in the ring shapes most flashlights have (they have a stippled reflector). Good colour temp for tungsten too.

As for a regular flashlight you can focus down to a super tight narrow beam, but has more daylight temp (with a hint of magenta), have a look at the LED Lenser T7 or P7 (same unit, different knurling finish). They push/pull focus, from kind of wide to very tight.

James Barber
Director/Editor/DP
London

kyanos@...
 


Hi,

I used a Megaray MR175 a couple of years ago in South Africa.  At the time, there were a couple of people in the states carrying them for rent but I don't recall who.  
It's an extremely powerful daylight balanced hand held light.  It connects to a small backpack that you wear that carries the battery.  If I recall, we got about 45 minutes out of a full charge.  
You can zoom the beam and it has a very tight spot.  We used them to simulate search lights out on the water at night and they worked great.  

The other option is to use a joker 200 with a battery powered ballast.  You can get a tight spot out of it by using the focal spot accessory.  You get about 30-40 minutes with two anton bauer bricks.  

Here is a contact at megaray to find out about local rentals.  
https://www.megaray.com/

friedland@...



Doug Glover
Cinematographer / Los Angeles

Marty Oppenheimer
 

Crystal

The original sunguns were 3200deg tungsten, 250w, but could have an added dichroic for 5600deg color.

They ran on 30v DC

Then there were 200w HMI sunguns, also running on 30w DC

We have both available for sale.

Marty Oppenheimer
Oppenheimer Camera Products
Seattle

Matthew Dorris
 

Rule Boston Camera used and may still carry one that was a small HMI with a handle and had a bandolier style battery that you could sling around your shoulder. May be worth reaching out to them.

Matt Dorris
DIT/DP
Boston MA

On Fri, Oct 26, 2018 at 12:29 PM kyanos via Cml.News <kyanos=mac.com@...> wrote:

Hi,

I used a Megaray MR175 a couple of years ago in South Africa.  At the time, there were a couple of people in the states carrying them for rent but I don't recall who.  
It's an extremely powerful daylight balanced hand held light.  It connects to a small backpack that you wear that carries the battery.  If I recall, we got about 45 minutes out of a full charge.  
You can zoom the beam and it has a very tight spot.  We used them to simulate search lights out on the water at night and they worked great.  

The other option is to use a joker 200 with a battery powered ballast.  You can get a tight spot out of it by using the focal spot accessory.  You get about 30-40 minutes with two anton bauer bricks.  

Here is a contact at megaray to find out about local rentals.  
https://www.megaray.com/

friedland@...



Doug Glover
Cinematographer / Los Angeles

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Matthew Dorris
651-491-6915

Crystal
 

Thank you everyone for the responses. I have found that a tactical flashlight is most appropriate for what I need .

Daniel Drasin
 

Jeff Kreines writes: The Sun Guns were made by Sylvania in the 60s and early 70s. Open-faced quartz lights — some AC and some with a battery pack — either 30v or the 12v “amateur” version. Usually mounted to the camera for really hideous lighting. 

--------

I can't hear "Sun Gun" without remembering an assistant who, despite repeated admonitions, held one a little too close to a huge, obscenely expensive one-way mirror in a hospital location.

Don't ask...

Dan Drasin
Producer/DP
Marin County, CA