Topics

Vintage Glass Effect

Stuart Brereton
 

Hi all,

I have a project coming up where one of the principal locations is an old Victorian house, which is somewhat in a state of disrepair. Although the house is old, the windows have been replaced with modern frames and glass.

We have a lot of moonlit scenes in the house, and I’d like to try to replicate the effect and distortions of old glass in the windows. I’m thinking about pushing light through frames of creased heat shield, or clear visqueen.

If anyone has any suggestions, or has done this before, please let me know.

Thanks,

Stuart Brereton
DP, LA

Thomas Townend
 



On 8 Mar 2018, at 23:16, Stuart Brereton <ssbrereton17@...> wrote:

We have a lot of moonlit scenes in the house, and I’d like to try to replicate the effect and distortions of old glass in the windows. I’m thinking about pushing light through frames of creased heat shield, or clear visqueen

I’m not sure this will have the desired effect as those will have a refractive index similar to glass but the distortion is across a much thinner substance and therefore won’t distort the light’s path to the same degree.  Though heavier and hence harder to handle your best bet would be to get some thick clear polycarbonate (Lexan, Perspex, http://www.perspexsheet.uk/clear-000-perspex/ ,etc) sheets and distort them with a blowtorch.

Some years ago I got some filters made up this way and distorted them using a vac-form process with just random bits and pieces thrown into the vacuum chamber for the plastic to deform around.

You can buy Perspex sheets at 5mm (I’d say the minimum worthwhile thickness - if you can get a thicker sheet to distort without having to resort to industrial processes, go for it) in several metres square.  I’d mount them in wooden frames and make sure they’re firmly screwed down before distorting them otherwise they’ll curl at the edges and become impossible to mount.

Then go at them with a heat gun (pretty inexpensive https://www.screwfix.com/c/tools/glue-heat-guns/cat830804) until you start to get bullseyes and warps and bubbling. Two layers warped and then mounted together will get you more complex and fine grained ‘caustics’ than you might otherwise be able to embed in a single layer.

Tom Townend,
Cinematographer/London

melight@...
 

vintage window look...
Try water glass sheets .... dave

David Bunge
Lighting Director/CLT
IATSE #50 Sacramento,CA.
http://www.sacramentogrip.com/
888 818-4448

From: Stuart Brereton <ssbrereton17@...>
To: cml-lighting@...
Sent: Thu, 08 Mar 2018 23:16:26 -0000 (UTC)
Subject: [lighting] Vintage Glass Effect
Hi all,
I have a project coming up where one of the principal locations is an old Victorian house, which is somewhat in a state of disrepair. Although the house is old, the windows have been replaced with modern frames and glass.
We have a lot of moonlit scenes in the house, and I’d like to try to replicate the effect and distortions of old glass in the windows. I’m thinking about pushing light through frames of creased heat shield, or clear visqueen.
If anyone has any suggestions, or has done this before, please let me know.
Thanks,
Stuart Brereton
DP, LA

Jim Hirsch
 

Stuart,

 

You might consider a leko (Joker, ETC LED, ETC.) with a Rosco glass gobo.  Take a look at the 33624 or similar.   With focus and light diffusion you can create ethereal effects without a lot of grip gear.

 

Sincerely,

 

Jim Hirsch

 

Jim Hirsch | Chief Operating Officer | High Output, Inc. | 495 Turnpike Street | Canton, MA 02021 | o: 781.364.1813 | c: 617.908.2958 | f: 781.364.1900 | jhirsch@...www.highoutput.com

 

Stuart Brereton
 

Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

I’ve been messing around with a few pieces of Flemish glass that I’ve got here, and a fresnel lamp with the lens removed. The Flemish pattern is not what we want, but the principle seems to work. Managed to find a place called Restoration Glass that makes proper handblown glass, with all the imperfections. Sounds horribly expensive, but we’ll see.

Tom, I’m heading to the workshop on monday with Lexan and heat gun in hand.

Dave, I’ll look into water glass

Jim, I was already thinking a Source 4 might be the way to go, but I’d forgotten about the Rosco gobos. Thanks.

Stuart Brereton
DP, LA

Thomas Townend
 



On 9 Mar 2018, at 14:59, Stuart Brereton <ssbrereton17@...> wrote:

a fresnel lamp with the lens removed

Aye, I’d say a Goya or an Arri X-lite would be the way forward.  The 'sharper’ the light source the more effective the distortion will be.

Maybe a clear glue or acrylic resin daubed at random on a clear sheet would be good too.  Hand blown glass has all sorts of bubbles and quite tight wrinkles in it.

Tom Townend,
Cinematographer/London.

Art Adams
 

Long ago I remember hearing a DP, Brian Reynolds, talking about how he'd made 4x4 reflectors out of brushed steel that had been dented with a ball peen hammer. Apparently the reflections were really interesting: textures and swirls, different colors, etc.

--
Art Adams
Director of Photography
San Francisco Bay Area

Thomas Townend
 

On 9 Mar 2018, at 15:15, Art Adams <art.cml.only@...> wrote:

brushed steel that had been dented with a ball peen hammer
Rosco or Lee silver reflector (or just silver Mylar / space blankets) spray mounted to foamcore and similarly battered would also work - though their heat resistance would be lower.
One gets into a greater pickle with space and positioning of lamps when an effect requires bouncing a hard reflection though - like trying to skip light off of trays of water for a ripple effect.

The beauty of something that just mimics hand blown glass being that it can just be mounted over existing windows and even appear in shot.

Tom Townend,
Cinematographer/London

Daniel Drasin
 

Art writes: Long ago I remember hearing a DP, Brian Reynolds, talking about how he'd made 4x4 reflectors out of brushed steel that had been dented with a ball peen hammer.
Apparently the reflections were really interesting: textures and swirls, different colors, etc.

************************

You can probably get somewhat similar effects using Reflectix insulation (thin, aluminized bubble wrap) tacked to a board. Held stationary it makes a semi-soft reflector.
Tilt it and its reflections can be lively.  Reflectix has other desirable properties you can play with -- you can bend, flex and mold it as needed, cut it into any shape, and even use it as protective padding when shipping equipment. You can also shape it into reflectors that fit inside China balls, which doubles light output in one direction and gives you some directional control. (Use with care when using hot incandescents, of course.)

See:  reflectixinc.com/products/double-reflective-insulation


Dan Drasin
Producer/DP
Marin County, CA