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Re: HDR question

Re: HDR question


alister@...
 

It doesn't mean anything to say 1000 Nits "is 10 stops". Stops are relative. 1000 Nits is about 10 stops more than 1 Nit, but 1 Nit has no special significance. SDR displays go much darker than that, and HDR ones more so. Also screen contrast ratios and scene contrast ratios are not the same thing.

Nick, could you enlighten me as to how the contrast ratio of a display is different to the contrast ratio of a scene, surely a ratio is a ratio, if a screen can show 10:1 and a scene is 10:1 are these ratios not the same?

Alister Chapman

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On 16 Mar 2018, at 12:37, Nick Shaw <nick@...> wrote:

On 16 Mar 2018, at 11:38, alister@... wrote:

Most real world HDR productions target 1000 to 1500 NITS for the final output, which is around 9 to 10 stops.

It doesn't mean anything to say 1000 Nits "is 10 stops". Stops are relative. 1000 Nits is about 10 stops more than 1 Nit, but 1 Nit has no special significance. SDR displays go much darker than that, and HDR ones more so. Also screen contrast ratios and scene contrast ratios are not the same thing.

But I agree with your point that pushing the exposure too far one way or the other, to protect either highlights or shadows can be a bad idea.

Nick Shaw
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