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Re: Integrity - was Curves and Bit Depth

Re: Integrity - was Curves and Bit Depth


Maxwell Geoffrey
 

Pawel,

     I don't think anyone here is actually advocating for working in a manner in which one must sacrifice their integrity just for the sake of getting paid or getting a job done, and I'm sure if we all owned our favorite cameras we'd happily shoot with them whenever we could.  Your goal with your work may be to capture images that are of the absolute highest technical quality and - as you sign your messages - "sharp to the edge".  There's nothing wrong with that, and if you can find enough work that allows you to uphold those values on every project you do, then that's great.  Frankly however, different things matter to different people, and if being able to work on a project you're passionate about means having to shoot in a compressed format, RAW or not, then so be it.  The reason for such a compromise may stem from the need for a fast turnaround on a project or to spend less time on set backing everything up, it might be because that's what works for everyone involved in the post production pipeline on a project, or it may be as simple as being on location with a limited number of cards and needing to make sure the director can get all the shots they want.  These problems are dealt with on productions of all budget sizes, so it's up to the DP to know whether or not the final image will actually suffer to a point where it isn't usable anymore.  That being said, for the vast majority of us, choosing one recording format over another or even one camera over another is by no means sacrificing our integrity.
     If anything, the widespread trend of DPs shooting with vintage or anamorphic lenses should be enough evidence that shooting images which are "sharp to the edge" just isn't a priority for all of us.  It doesn't mean we aren't aware of the technicalities of our craft, but why should someone turn down shooting with a particular lens just because it has a poor MTF?  If it makes the image they want, one that feels right for the particular project, isn't turning it down just because a graph says it's technically not as good as something else also sacrificing their integrity?  Film is an art form, and no matter how insanely technical its crafts may be, what ultimately matters is how the audience feels when watching it.  If you want things to feel as if they were captured flawlessly, thats fine, but if you want them to feel less technically perfect, that's fine too.  As Geoff often says, "fuck the numbers".  Just make images which work for whatever it is that you're trying to do.

Best Wishes,

Maxwell Geoffrey
DP | Colorist
New York

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