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Chart of camera responses side by side


Geoff Boyle
 

I’ve hesitated posting this chart because I know I’m going to get enormous grief from it but WTF 😊

 

The cameras are Alexa-Mini, Canon C200, Panasonic Varicam Pure, RED Monstro & Sony Venice

 

The figures are generated by reading a Kodak 18% grey chart at exposures in half stop intervals.

 

I loaded everything into Resolve 15.2 in ACEScct using the manufacturers IDT’s and an ODT to Rec2020 4,000 nit

 

As you can see the Sony & Panasonic responses are almost identical, the Canon is a bit lower contrast, the Alexa has a slightly steeper slope and the Monstro, well I’m not saying a word.

 

I used the C200 rather than the C700FF because I only had the C200 in RAW, the C700FF raw was in a Codex file and not easily usable.

 

cheers
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076

www.gboyle.nl

www.cinematography.net

 

 


alister@...
 

Thanks for publishing this Geoff. 

Very interesting. Could some of the smaller bumps just be down to small variations in precise exposure, after all we are only human. I’m just curious about the little bump that the Sony and Red appear to exhibit at almost exactly the same place around the mid point.

Not really too sure what to take away from the chart as we don’t know how much of the contrast/brightness difference is down to the IDT. But I would suggest that from a DR point of view alone, that all of these cameras should be able to produce broadly similar results with one seemingly quite spectacular exception.



Alister Chapman

DoP - Stereographer
UK Mobile +44 7711 152226
US Mobile +1(216)298-1977


www.xdcam-user.com    1.5 million hits, 100,000 visits from over 45,000 unique visitors every month!  Film and Video production techniques, reviews and news.

















On 11 Jan 2019, at 08:32, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

I’ve hesitated posting this chart because I know I’m going to get enormous grief from it but WTF 😊
 
The cameras are Alexa-Mini, Canon C200, Panasonic Varicam Pure, RED Monstro & Sony Venice
 
The figures are generated by reading a Kodak 18% grey chart at exposures in half stop intervals.
 
I loaded everything into Resolve 15.2 in ACEScct using the manufacturers IDT’s and an ODT to Rec2020 4,000 nit
 
As you can see the Sony & Panasonic responses are almost identical, the Canon is a bit lower contrast, the Alexa has a slightly steeper slope and the Monstro, well I’m not saying a word.
 
I used the C200 rather than the C700FF because I only had the C200 in RAW, the C700FF raw was in a Codex file and not easily usable.
 
cheers 
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076
 
 
<Camera responses.pdf>


Colin Elves
 

Did you get that Sekonic Exposure target II in the end? That’s designed to do this sort of thing, but with fewer exposures as the chart covers 4 stops in 1/3 stop increments. 

You can vary the exposure exactly by adjusting shutter speed. Might be some issues with increased noise in the shadows when using high shutter speeds - but it’s a toss up between that and irregularities due to NDs or human error in the T stop.

Biggest issue, I imagine, was trying to get an even exposure with 6 stops over at ISO 500 for the Venice without setting fire to the chart!

Colin Elves, 
DP, Berlin.

On 11 Jan 2019, at 11:00, alister@... wrote:

Thanks for publishing this Geoff. 

Very interesting. Could some of the smaller bumps just be down to small variations in precise exposure, after all we are only human. I’m just curious about the little bump that the Sony and Red appear to exhibit at almost exactly the same place around the mid point.




Alister Chapman



The figures are generated by reading a Kodak 18% grey chart at exposures in half stop intervals.
 
0FF because I only had the C200 in RAW, the C700FF raw was in a Codex file and not easily usable.
 
cheers 
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076
 
 
<Camera responses.pdf>

_._,_._,_



Geoff Boyle
 

The bump is due to using an ND filter to make the full exposure series.

 

I could have smoothed out the curves but I thought it would be more honest if I didn’t.

 

It’s odd that the Sony has this as we would have used its internal filters. With the Red we used an external one.

 

cheers
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076

www.gboyle.nl

www.cinematography.net

 

 

From: cml-raw-log-hdr@... <cml-raw-log-hdr@...> On Behalf Of alister@...
Sent: 11 January 2019 11:00
To: cml-raw-log-hdr@...
Subject: Re: [cml-raw-log-hdr] Chart of camera responses side by side

 

Thanks for publishing this Geoff. 

 

Very interesting. Could some of the smaller bumps just be down to small variations in precise exposure, after all we are only human. I’m just curious about the little bump that the Sony and Red appear to exhibit at almost exactly the same place around the mid point.

 

Not really too sure what to take away from the chart as we don’t know how much of the contrast/brightness difference is down to the IDT. But I would suggest that from a DR point of view alone, that all of these cameras should be able to produce broadly similar results with one seemingly quite spectacular exception.

 

 

 

Alister Chapman

 

DoP - Stereographer

UK Mobile +44 7711 152226

US Mobile +1(216)298-1977

 

 

www.xdcam-user.com    1.5 million hits, 100,000 visits from over 45,000 unique visitors every month!  Film and Video production techniques, reviews and news.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



On 11 Jan 2019, at 08:32, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

 

I’ve hesitated posting this chart because I know I’m going to get enormous grief from it but WTF 😊

 

The cameras are Alexa-Mini, Canon C200, Panasonic Varicam Pure, RED Monstro & Sony Venice

 

The figures are generated by reading a Kodak 18% grey chart at exposures in half stop intervals.

 

I loaded everything into Resolve 15.2 in ACEScct using the manufacturers IDT’s and an ODT to Rec2020 4,000 nit

 

As you can see the Sony & Panasonic responses are almost identical, the Canon is a bit lower contrast, the Alexa has a slightly steeper slope and the Monstro, well I’m not saying a word.

 

I used the C200 rather than the C700FF because I only had the C200 in RAW, the C700FF raw was in a Codex file and not easily usable.

 

cheers 
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076

 

 

<Camera responses.pdf>

 


Daniel Perez
 

Not sure I understand the values on the vertical axis of the graph.

Y axis ranges from 0 to 900. Nits?

X axis shows 27 steps. Each one represent a half stop interval, right? Or am I completely lost?

ISO ?? Same on all cameras?

Daniel Perez
WhyOnSet Madrid
OnSet Workflow/Color


On 11 Jan 2019, at 09:32, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

<image001.gif>

I’ve hesitated posting this chart because I know I’m going to get enormous grief from it but WTF 😊

 

The cameras are Alexa-Mini, Canon C200, Panasonic Varicam Pure, RED Monstro & Sony Venice

 

The figures are generated by reading a Kodak 18% grey chart at exposures in half stop intervals.

 

I loaded everything into Resolve 15.2 in ACEScct using the manufacturers IDT’s and an ODT to Rec2020 4,000 nit

 

As you can see the Sony & Panasonic responses are almost identical, the Canon is a bit lower contrast, the Alexa has a slightly steeper slope and the Monstro, well I’m not saying a word.

 

I used the C200 rather than the C700FF because I only had the C200 in RAW, the C700FF raw was in a Codex file and not easily usable.

 

cheers
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076

www.gboyle.nl

www.cinematography.net

 

 

<Camera responses.pdf>


Ben Allan ACS
 

Hi Geoff,
This is my results for Alexa, Red & Ursa 4.6K from a little while back. 
Cheers,
Ben

image1.jpeg



On 11 Jan 2019, at 7:32 pm, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

<image001.gif>

I’ve hesitated posting this chart because I know I’m going to get enormous grief from it but WTF 😊

 

The cameras are Alexa-Mini, Canon C200, Panasonic Varicam Pure, RED Monstro & Sony Venice

 

The figures are generated by reading a Kodak 18% grey chart at exposures in half stop intervals.

 

I loaded everything into Resolve 15.2 in ACEScct using the manufacturers IDT’s and an ODT to Rec2020 4,000 nit

 

As you can see the Sony & Panasonic responses are almost identical, the Canon is a bit lower contrast, the Alexa has a slightly steeper slope and the Monstro, well I’m not saying a word.

 

I used the C200 rather than the C700FF because I only had the C200 in RAW, the C700FF raw was in a Codex file and not easily usable.

 

cheers
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076

www.gboyle.nl

www.cinematography.net

 

 

<Camera responses.pdf>


Geoff Boyle
 

Y axis is 10 bit reading from 18% grey card

X is half stops

I SO all the same, this meant that the Venice was set to 800 instead of 500

Geoff Boyle NSC
Cinematographer
Netherlands


From: cml-raw-log-hdr@... <cml-raw-log-hdr@...> on behalf of Daniel Perez <danibam@...>
Sent: Friday, January 11, 2019 9:57:46 AM
To: cml-raw-log-hdr@...
Subject: Re: [cml-raw-log-hdr] Chart of camera responses side by side
 
Not sure I understand the values on the vertical axis of the graph.

Y axis ranges from 0 to 900. Nits?

X axis shows 27 steps. Each one represent a half stop interval, right? Or am I completely lost?

ISO ?? Same on all cameras?

Daniel Perez
WhyOnSet Madrid
OnSet Workflow/Color


On 11 Jan 2019, at 09:32, Geoff Boyle <geoff@...> wrote:

<image001.gif>

I’ve hesitated posting this chart because I know I’m going to get enormous grief from it but WTF 😊

 

The cameras are Alexa-Mini, Canon C200, Panasonic Varicam Pure, RED Monstro & Sony Venice

 

The figures are generated by reading a Kodak 18% grey chart at exposures in half stop intervals.

 

I loaded everything into Resolve 15.2 in ACEScct using the manufacturers IDT’s and an ODT to Rec2020 4,000 nit

 

As you can see the Sony & Panasonic responses are almost identical, the Canon is a bit lower contrast, the Alexa has a slightly steeper slope and the Monstro, well I’m not saying a word.

 

I used the C200 rather than the C700FF because I only had the C200 in RAW, the C700FF raw was in a Codex file and not easily usable.

 

cheers
Geoff Boyle NSC
EU based cinematographer
+31 637155076

www.gboyle.nl

www.cinematography.net

 

 

<Camera responses.pdf>


Geoff Boyle
 

OK, this is a public response to a private message...

All the raw files are available  at www.cmltests.net

If I have "totally fucked up the Red" please download all the material and show me where I went wrong.

All the material  was treated in exactly the same way.


Mark Weingartner, ASC
 

For some reason this test and the data from it remind me of the Panavision Genesis log encoding scheme wherein the intent of the tone mapping was to create a “perceptually uniform grayscale coding”

Nice to see the similarities and differences as a quantification of things I may have developed a sense for from working with different cameras.


Weingartner, ASC

Lost Angeles

DP and stuff


Art Adams
 

The bumps could be due to ND filters, which I believe Geoff mentioned he used during the tests. Dye ND filters can be… shall we say, variable? That may explain the bumps in otherwise smooth curves.

 

Art Adams

Cinema Lens Specialist

 

ARRI Inc.
600 North Victory Blvd
Burbank, CA 91502
Phone:  (818) 841-7070
Fax:     (818) 848-4028

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