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Easy Rig Alternatives


esl34@...
 

Hey All,

I've been happily using Easyrigs since about 2013 (300N, 400N, Vario), but always renting them against production budgets.  I currently have an opportunity to make a purchase and am faced with the question of pulling the trigger on an actual Easyrig or one of the far less expensive alternatives like the FLYCAM Flowline.  Does anyone have experience with the FLYCAM or other  Easyrig-style supports and would you mind sharing your thoughts? Are there compromises?  Is the build of the vest and the arm/spring support comparable?

Thanks in advance,
Eric
____________

Eric Liner

Producer, Cinematographer
607.254.2191 (office)

607.227.0350 (cell)
esl34@...

http://www.facebook.com/birdofpreymovie


Graham Futerfas
 

You might also want to check out the ErgoRig for handheld work. It relieves the spinal compression, and a lot of operators have loved it. See if you can find a demo or a place to try it on.

https://www.ergorig.com/

Best,
-Graham



---
Graham Futerfas
Director of Photography
Los Angeles, CA
www.GFuterfas.com
---


Pedro Feria Pino
 

I have been using an Ergorig for 6 months and it is an amazing tool. Not as bulky and cumbersome as an Ezrig. I absolutely love mine. 


On Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 2:16 PM Graham Futerfas <gfuterfas.cml@...> wrote:
You might also want to check out the ErgoRig for handheld work. It relieves the spinal compression, and a lot of operators have loved it. See if you can find a demo or a place to try it on.

https://www.ergorig.com/

Best,
-Graham



---
Graham Futerfas
Director of Photography
Los Angeles, CA
www.GFuterfas.com
---


Fran Tormo
 

I see the Ergorig super useful for doc style, but what about those shots at chest level or under? How can I manage to get this flow feeling that gives you essyrig?

Fran Tormo
Dop 
Killthetv.com

Enviado desde mi iPhone

El 14 feb 2020, a las 4:10, Pedro Feria Pino <vefilm@...> escribió:


I have been using an Ergorig for 6 months and it is an amazing tool. Not as bulky and cumbersome as an Ezrig. I absolutely love mine. 

On Thu, Feb 13, 2020, 2:16 PM Graham Futerfas <gfuterfas.cml@...> wrote:
You might also want to check out the ErgoRig for handheld work. It relieves the spinal compression, and a lot of operators have loved it. See if you can find a demo or a place to try it on.

https://www.ergorig.com/

Best,
-Graham



---
Graham Futerfas
Director of Photography
Los Angeles, CA
www.GFuterfas.com
---


Mark Kenfield
 

Ergorig have an "Underslung" attachment, to suspend the camera down low. And it looks decent, however it's pretty pricey for what it does (more than I could justify when I put in my order for one) I think it's worth investigating DIY options before plonking down the cash.

My plan is to see how a simple Cinesaddle works slung over the Ergorig's brace (which is how I'd do underslung normally if I'm not using an Easyrig), I suspect it'll be fine (and much easier on the body with the weight taken off the back by slinging it over the Ergorig instead of my shoulder).

Adding a bracket/eyelet to the Ergorig, and running some standard climbing rope/clamps through it, might also make for a good option.

Cheers,

Mark Kenfield
Cinematographer

0400 044 500


On Fri, 14 Feb 2020 at 18:40, Fran Tormo <francisco.tormo@...> wrote:
I see the Ergorig super useful for doc style, but what about those shots at chest level or under? How can I manage to get this flow feeling that gives you essyrig?

Fran Tormo
Dop 
Killthetv.com

Enviado desde mi iPhone